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Thread: Victorian radiator plate warmer - photo

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    Jon
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    Victorian radiator plate warmer - photo

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    They had circulated hot water heat back then? Obviously the copper pipes are new.

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    Quote Originally Posted by jdurand View Post
    They had circulated hot water heat back then? Obviously the copper pipes are new.
    No point making radiators if they didnt have hot water (or steam) so of course they did

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    Best I can find is Victorian Era used steam radiators, maybe the pictured one was converted to hot water at a later date when reliable electric pumps existed. I see companies still make "Victorian" radiators that are compatible with modern hot water systems.

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    Wet steam and hot water is the same thing really ,dry steam is a different story and not used in domestic area as way too dangerous.
    You dont need a pump if the system is designed around a thermosyphon principle which they mainly are cause if u rely on pumping it the system will be prone to vapour locking and inefficiencies

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    I've stayed in older hotels and boarding houses where these were being used they would keep stones or bricks wrapped and sewn in wool coverings stored in these radiators to take out and place between the mattresses and heavy blankets of the beds. When you crawled in and snuggled between those flannel sheets you just knew you were going to be toasty warm throughout the night. Just don't forget to return the stones to the radiators in the morning or the next night was going to be cold.
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    Very interesting, it was one, not old as Victorian but before 1930 I think in our family farm eating room.
    Originally in my opinion made for the wood heated thermosiphon technology as it's in my own 1935 home, the space was used for (farm) workers to kept hot the meat when you work outside, in woods for example, and when you come back home it was not necessary to stop for cooking.
    Last edited by Okapi; 09-15-2019 at 12:54 AM.

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    Supporting Member ncollar's Avatar
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    When I went to my grandparents home they had radiator through the house. All three stories had them and in the closet in one of the bedrooms on the third floor had a storage tank that held water and a furnace in the basement to heat the water. Very good working system as long as the right person firing the furnace.
    Nelson


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