Free 173 Best Homemade Tools eBook:  
Page 92 of 94 FirstFirst ... 42 68 69 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80 81 82 83 84 85 86 87 88 89 90 91 92 93 94 LastLast
Results 911 to 920 of 932

Thread: Vintage work crew photos

  1. #911
    mklotz mklotz's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2015
    Location
    LA, CA, USA
    Posts
    1,872
    Thanks
    149
    Thanked 3,632 Times in 1,239 Posts

    mklotz's Tools
    Is it to "catch" the ship or to act as a brake to slow the ship as it slides into the water?

    From what I've seen in videos it seems to be the latter rather than the former. With a very heavy ship, I would think that a "catch" would simply tear the chain anchor point out of the ship or the dock when the chain went taut. OTOH, a slowly moving ship could be restrained by a stretchy tether such as heavy rope.

    In this video of the launching of the Queen Mary...



    the use of drag chains to slow the ship is mentioned at approximately 3:45 minutes into the video.
    Last edited by mklotz; 08-10-2019 at 10:47 AM.
    ---
    Regards, Marv


    Home Shop Freeware
    http://www.myvirtualnetwork.com/mklotz

  2. The Following 3 Users Say Thank You to mklotz For This Useful Post:

    baja (08-13-2019), high-side (08-12-2019), volodar (08-10-2019)

  3. #912
    Jon
    Jon is online now Jon has agreed the Seller's Terms of Service
    Administrator Jon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Colorado, USA
    Posts
    16,112
    Thanks
    3,724
    Thanked 14,556 Times in 4,432 Posts
    Pouring concrete, Vancouver, 1931.
    Fullsize image: https://s3-us-west-1.amazonaws.com/h...w_fullsize.jpg


  4. The Following 4 Users Say Thank You to Jon For This Useful Post:

    baja (08-13-2019), high-side (08-12-2019), jackhoying (08-10-2019), Seedtick (08-12-2019)

  5. #913

    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    Hinchinbrook QLD
    Posts
    252
    Thanks
    29
    Thanked 95 Times in 60 Posts
    Listen to what the commentator says, "The enormous drag chains take up the strain and brake the momentum of the launch", At 3:59 - 4:03 you even see the chains pull tight

  6. #914
    ranald's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2018
    Location
    Black Mountain Queensland
    Posts
    1,115
    Thanks
    805
    Thanked 297 Times in 205 Posts

    ranald's Tools
    #913 bit like watching a dragline chain get taught: I was very fit early 70s, and couldn't lift one link allbeit attached to a whole chain. What a Strain also on the restrainers!? I could hold that. LOL

  7. #915
    Toolmaker51's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2016
    Location
    Midwest USA
    Posts
    1,984
    Thanks
    3,536
    Thanked 1,617 Times in 983 Posts

    Toolmaker51's Tools
    She might have aged some, but touring the Queen Mary envelopes one with an indescribable sense of wonder; when design, engineering, craftsmanship converge. Once again, prime example achieved with nothing but paper, ink and endless calculations, and sufficient reliable capital equipment.
    Sincerely,
    Toolmaker51
    ...we'll learn more by wandering than searching...

  8. #916
    Ralphxyz's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2016
    Posts
    600
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 117 Times in 98 Posts

    Ralphxyz's Tools
    What are those 3 yard cement mixers?

  9. #917
    mklotz mklotz's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2015
    Location
    LA, CA, USA
    Posts
    1,872
    Thanks
    149
    Thanked 3,632 Times in 1,239 Posts

    mklotz's Tools
    Quote Originally Posted by Toolmaker51 View Post
    She might have aged some, but touring the Queen Mary envelopes one with an indescribable sense of wonder; when design, engineering, craftsmanship converge. Once again, prime example achieved with nothing but paper, ink and endless calculations, and sufficient reliable capital equipment.
    The story surrounding the naming of the ship has always made me smile. This excerpt from the Wikipedia article on the ship recounts it succinctly...

    Legend has it that Cunard intended to name the ship Victoria, in keeping with company tradition of giving its ships names ending in "ia", but when company representatives asked the king's permission to name the ocean liner after Britain's "greatest queen", he said his wife, Mary of Teck, would be delighted. And so, the legend goes, the delegation had of course no other choice but to report that No. 534 would be called Queen Mary.
    ---
    Regards, Marv


    Home Shop Freeware
    http://www.myvirtualnetwork.com/mklotz

  10. The Following User Says Thank You to mklotz For This Useful Post:

    Toolmaker51 (08-11-2019)

  11. #918
    Toolmaker51's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2016
    Location
    Midwest USA
    Posts
    1,984
    Thanks
    3,536
    Thanked 1,617 Times in 983 Posts

    Toolmaker51's Tools
    Quote Originally Posted by mklotz View Post
    The story surrounding the naming of the ship has always made me smile. This excerpt from the Wikipedia article on the ship recounts it succinctly...

    Legend has it that Cunard intended to name the ship Victoria, in keeping with company tradition of giving its ships names ending in "ia", but when company representatives asked the king's permission to name the ocean liner after Britain's "greatest queen", he said his wife, Mary of Teck, would be delighted. And so, the legend goes, the delegation had of course no other choice but to report that No. 534 would be called Queen Mary.
    Yes. That's smile worthy.
    Illustrates one's wishes need to be clear for desired results from other parties.

    PS Wikipedia offers good reads on Victoria, Mary, and Elizabeth. Someday we'll get a female of that standard for nomination to president; so far none have possessed such factors. Put nicely, this crop manages the direct opposites.
    Sincerely,
    Toolmaker51
    ...we'll learn more by wandering than searching...

  12. #919
    Jon
    Jon is online now Jon has agreed the Seller's Terms of Service
    Administrator Jon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Colorado, USA
    Posts
    16,112
    Thanks
    3,724
    Thanked 14,556 Times in 4,432 Posts
    Trappers putting muskrat skins on wire stretchers before hanging them up to dry in back of their marsh camp. Delacroix Island, Saint Bernard Parish, Louisiana. January 1941.
    Fullsize image: https://s3-us-west-1.amazonaws.com/h...s_fullsize.jpg


  13. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to Jon For This Useful Post:

    baja (08-15-2019), Seedtick (08-14-2019)

  14. #920
    Ralphxyz's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2016
    Posts
    600
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 117 Times in 98 Posts

    Ralphxyz's Tools
    judging from the pile of wire stretchers there would be a lot of skun muskrats. I'd like to see the after picture.

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 4 users browsing this thread. (1 members and 3 guests)

  1. Toolmaker51

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •