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Thread: What is this???

  1. #21
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    Might you find an image of one online? I've tried but may be using the incorrect term.

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  2. #22
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    I vote for the casting/molding indicator. The two digit code could represent anything the manufacturer wanted. Date, shift, line, operator.
    The mold may have used multiple such devices to record whatever necessary.

  3. #23
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    I am getting to the discussion late, but it is indeed a foundry tool. If you carefully examine many molded items, even plastic products, you will markings from similar devices. Look at the bottom of a plastic bucket, or the back side of most manufactured plastic products.

    What is this???-foundry-marking.jpeg

    The item you have was screwed to a pattern, then used to make a mold for any number of different materials; metal, concrete, clay, plastic, etc.

  4. #24
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    It was mounted on something and it resembles that which might be mounted on a briefcase or suitcase or box.
    Id be curious if there might be a magnet inside of each, such that the correct orientation unlocks a magnetic latch embedded in the briefcase or suitcase or box.

  5. #25
    Supporting Member Saltfever's Avatar
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    Well I like the idea of a foundry pattern, however, it is not likely something that had to be pulled from a mold. There is NO draft anywhere on the part, or the circular edges, and the spacing between the circles is problematic. Sand (or whatever) compacted between the two counters would most likely be broken away as the pattern is pulled. At any rate, that area between counters would need extreme care for a clean pull. Patterns are designed for the cleanest, simplest, labor technique. It is obviously a counter but something probably used as Marv (post #5 ) has indicated.
    Last edited by Saltfever; Apr 12, 2021 at 02:18 AM.

  6. #26
    Supporting Member hemmjo's Avatar
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    I certainly agree, there is no draft on the the counter anyplace except the pointer and the numbers.

    The whole counter would not be exposed to the sand. In use the counter would be inset into the pattern, making the numbers flush with the surface. Then a cover set over the counter flush with the surface of the pattern, leaving only the numbers and pointer exposed to the sand and requiring draft. The straight sides of the "dials" would make it very easy to make a cover by simply drilling proper holes. (reference post #23 ).

    While Marv's thoughts are certainly plausible, if the item were not to be used as a pattern, I am thinking the pointers would be much more ergonomically designed.

    It would be nice to find the exact item in a description someplace.

  7. #27
    Supporting Member Saltfever's Avatar
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    Pattern (foundry) counters usually indicate a day, heat, lot, month, etc. I have never seen them changed for each individual casting. As such they may be changed at the end of the day, the shift, or the week, etc. The pointers in the pic are designed to be easily grasped to facilitate a quick change. As such, they will leave a large protrusion in the casting and are a waste of good metal as well. Totally unnecessary for casting ID. From the looks of the abused holes the device was fastened with split lock washers, again, something you would not see on a well made pattern. The scenario you describe is quite interesting. Although, I have never experienced such a technique, I agree that it would work on a limited basis. Having loose parts, and added complexity is problematic on a foundry line. On the initial RFQ I would be talking to the designer to make a change or be faced with an undesirable cost increase. YMMV



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    Last edited by Saltfever; Apr 13, 2021 at 01:20 AM.

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