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Thread: Yet another Honey-Do: Growling washing machine, Pt 1

  1. #1
    Supporting Member DIYSwede's Avatar
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    Smile Yet another Honey-Do: Growling washing machine, Pt 1

    After some 7 years of immaculate service our Ariston Hotpoint "ECO" 8 kg capacity & 1600 rpm spin, "WMD 863B EU" model,
    started some "growling" in its spin cycle, driving my beloved up the wall (see pic - the machine: neither the partner nor the wall):

    Yet another Honey-Do: Growling washing machine, Pt 1-wmd-863b-eu.jpg

    The sound got louder and louder thru the weeks, making us all realize: "Some things needs to get done by somebody."
    My 1st thought: Change of bearings & oil seal: How hard can that be? Famous last words...
    Also being cheap-to-the-bone - I didn't want to spend app 620 bucks for a new washer of similar capacity,
    so I forewarned about a 1 week standstill for our present one, giving all the sensitive persons in the area time to clean their necessities.

    Meanwhile, doing some Interweb research regarding spare bearing kits for the model in question: Nada!
    There was a spare part being offered, all right: An entire "drum unit" for a mere 200 bucks.
    "BS" I thought - a purported "eco friendly" machine would never provide that sort of landfill waste...

    -Any reader suggestions on the environmental friendliness of ditching an entire drum to replace a coupla bearings and a seal?

    So: Armed with the necessary and sufficient tools and hopefully ditto skills and knowledge for the job,
    I happily unplugged the water and drain hose and electrical cable without mishaps.
    Reverse engineered the machine : top lid, front and rear panels, unbolting the motor and belt,
    dislodged the front bellows, unplugged all the electrical connectors AFTER marking all their proper places,
    taking cellphone shots of crucial places, loosen the concrete top weight and marking all the bolts.

    Last was the bottom hose clamp, then "the Sealed Unit" was just hanging in two springs on two dampers.
    Turning the drum did produce a resonant growl in the unit, so I seemed on the right track.
    Getting the unit up and out of the enclosure went smooth though it was a pretty heavy lift.
    The entire machine weighs in at over 75 kgs. Unbolted the bottom concrete block.
    45 minutes had elapsed - this was going even better than expected!
    -Y'a all still remember the "Pt 1" in the title, right?

    -Voila: "The Unit".

    Yet another Honey-Do: Growling washing machine, Pt 1-welded-drum....jpg

    The Greeks called their fundamental constituent particle "Atom", "ἄτομος": greek for "inseparable",
    only to be proved false some 25 centuries later.
    Consequently I was very much in the mood for dividing "The Unit" (alleged by some manufacturer) into its constituent parts:

    Yet another Honey-Do: Growling washing machine, Pt 1-unsealing-drum.jpg

    Trying to prove I'm not entirely nuts, I had previously drilled a lot of 5,2 mm holes through the "weld seam" in the two halves,
    providing a means of rigidly holding them together with M5 screws and nuts in the bright, promising future.
    Hypothesis for keeping the previously "Sealed Unit" water-tight will probably be revealed and tested,
    given I can get the old bearings out, and new ones could be found and delivered.

    2B continued...
    45 Best Harbor Freight Tool Modifications

    Last edited by DIYSwede; 05-23-2020 at 02:31 PM. Reason: cleaned line breaks

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    Crusty (05-23-2020), Frank S (05-23-2020), Scotsman Hosie (05-25-2020)

  3. #2
    Supporting Member Crusty's Avatar
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    Crusty's Tools
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    This brings back memories of the time that I replaced a drum belt on our clothes dryer. What I discovered in that seemingly endless episode was that I had to completely disassemble the dryer, suspend the new belt alone in the air, and then reassemble all of the dryer parts around that suspended belt. If I ever meet the guy that designed that thing I may still choke him.
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    If you can't make it precise make it adjustable.

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    Supporting Member Frank S's Avatar
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    Frank S's Tools
    I sincerely wish you good luck on the separation, and subsequent bearing replacement, but I hold fear that you will probably have to resort to option "A" my least preference as well. However since they do offer a full drum motor unit as a replacement part option "B" in this case may be viable. These things are designed by sadomasochists, however let's hope that you are able to procure new bearings and figure out how to make a seal for it. You may have to resource the bearings by dimensional sizing only as they are most likely without numbers on them or are proprietary in nature
    Last edited by Frank S; 05-23-2020 at 08:36 AM.
    Never try to tell me it can't be done
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    Supporting Member DIYSwede's Avatar
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    DIYSwede's Tools
    Thanks, Frank - If I need to order the whole drum ass'y at least I tried, and learned a few things under way.
    Which isn't bad at all !
    Re Ball Bearings - SKF is a Swedish company, after all! The oil seal might be harder...

    Cheers!
    Johan

  6. #5
    Supporting Member DIYSwede's Avatar
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    DIYSwede's Tools

    Growling washing machine, Pt 2...

    Being at it again, as time is money and winners never quit - successfully sawed the previously "Sealed Unit" apart.
    Drum and its axle spider intact from rust, but the insides carry app a pound of organic and non-organic yecchy compounds...

    Reason for failure: Oil seal (ROLF 40,2x72x10/13,5mm) had cracked its inner lip,
    ruining the balls in the first NSK 6207 DU sealed bearing, the Polish rear PPL 6206 Z still intact.

    Yet another Honey-Do: Growling washing machine, Pt 1-opened-carcass.jpg Yet another Honey-Do: Growling washing machine, Pt 1-gizzards.jpg Yet another Honey-Do: Growling washing machine, Pt 1-failed-oil-seal.jpg

    I had to provide a few quickly improvised tools for taking out the bearings, their housing being a tapered affair:

    Yet another Honey-Do: Growling washing machine, Pt 1-diy-bearing-puller.jpg Yet another Honey-Do: Growling washing machine, Pt 1-turning-bearing-puller.jpg Yet another Honey-Do: Growling washing machine, Pt 1-snug-fitting-puller.jpg

    Heat from a hair dryer, application of homebrewed "Ed's Red" creep oil, yanking the wrenches and knocking from the rear,
    finally got the bearings and the remains of the oil seal out. Real tight press fit taking its toll on the impromptu tools:

    Yet another Honey-Do: Growling washing machine, Pt 1-diy-gadgets.jpg Yet another Honey-Do: Growling washing machine, Pt 1-puller-after-job.jpg

    Cleaning & decalcification will commence, as orders have been placed for SKF 6206 & 6207 RSH "Explorer",
    and another (non-Italian this time) oil seal.
    50 bucks delivered by Schenker is the minimum "Learning Fee" for yours truly -
    add another 10 for fasteners, sealant etc.

    Then some DIY bearing-setting tools will be made, an expired but full CO2 extinguisher
    brought home from work for freezing the bearings and drum axle before mounting.
    I might also have to modify a borrowed Alfra hydraulic hand punch for the last shove of the bearings,
    as the darned tub just won't fit into the hydraulic press at work...

    Next: Refitting the drum and tub halves together: liberally seal up the gap with RTV silicone* and bolt together,
    let sit for curing some 72-ish hours. Add concrete counterweights, drop down with drum opening to front.
    Bolt up, add hoses, hook wires up, add covers - (check for "leftover" pieces) and test run!

    At least - that's the "Plan A". Then the (formerly) sealed tub might leak, the electronics go AWOL
    or other mishaps will happen through Providence or my own fault, that'll surely keep me alert!
    I can always buy another sealed tub as a first emergency exit, or even a new machine if I get entirely bored.

    * -Any HMT:ers knowledgeable about the >90 deg C heat-, acid- & alkali-resistance of run-of-the-mill cheap RTV?
    Other suggestions and points of view welcome as well, as always!

    Cheers
    Johan
    Last edited by DIYSwede; 05-24-2020 at 06:04 AM. Reason: Terrible line breaks

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    Scotsman Hosie (05-26-2020)

  8. #6
    Supporting Member Frank S's Avatar
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    Frank S's Tools
    Is there a way you can very carefully cut a grove all the way around in the surface area where the 2 plastic housings mate up to each other say a grove of about 1 mm deep and wide in 1 or both of the mating surfaces this would allow the RTV to create an o ring out of itself thus providing a much better possibility for a good seal.
    I regularly do this on machined surfaces of engines where the manufacture decided that RTV was enough of a seal between 2 machined surfaces but over time had become focal points of oil or water leaks.
    Doing this also creates a cavity which holds the RTV in place should there be any slight vibration movement.
    An explanation shown here
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    Never try to tell me it can't be done
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    DIYSwede (05-24-2020)

  10. #7
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    Thanks, Frank - I totally buy your suggestion!
    There's enough material in the two flanges to provide this, either by a smallish Dremel burr or a more crude soldering iron.
    Then finely sand the two faces flat, though my saw provided a really nice initial cut -
    the saw has no kerf on the teeth and some blade friction seemed to smooth out the mating surfaces.

  11. #8
    Supporting Member Frank S's Avatar
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    Frank S's Tools
    Quote Originally Posted by DIYSwede View Post
    Thanks, Frank - I totally buy your suggestion!
    There's enough material in the two flanges to provide this, either by a smallish Dremel burr or a more crude soldering iron.
    Then finely sand the two faces flat, though my saw provided a really nice initial cut -
    the saw has no kerf on the teeth and some blade friction seemed to smooth out the mating surfaces.
    I wish you luck, slow is the go word time spent is time saved
    Never try to tell me it can't be done
    When I have to paint I use http://kbs.justoldtrucks.com/

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    DIYSwede (05-25-2020)

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    Growling washing machine, Pt 3...

    While awaiting arrival of the new bearings and oil seal, I might as well get prepared for their installation.

    The first casting I ever made a few years ago was dirty and porous, so I might as well use it for some temporary job.
    All DIY: pouring the melt into Cocoa Milk cans, hence the small groove (from the can's mouth) near the cutting tool.
    AlSiZn (of unknown proportions) billet in the chuck, making a pair of bearing mandrels:

    Yet another Honey-Do: Growling washing machine, Pt 1-turning-alsi9cu2fe-diy-billet.jpg Yet another Honey-Do: Growling washing machine, Pt 1-bearing-test-fit.jpg

    Machines excellently, as the high Si content makes for short, curly chips.
    Carbide insert at high revs still makes a decent satin finish outta this POS,
    though inner porosity is really bad at the center. AlSi dulls HSS tools pretty quick
    (I've since learned to only stick to remelting with previously diecast stuff containing AlSi9Cu3Fe)
    These mandrels will only bear on the outer race - the rest is relieved. Right pic: Entire "2nd line of defense" unit.

    Yet another Honey-Do: Growling washing machine, Pt 1-bearing-mandrels.jpg Yet another Honey-Do: Growling washing machine, Pt 1-bearing-press-gadget.jpg

    This will only be used as an eventuality, if the following won't suffice - as my "1st line" method for fitting the bearings will be:

    1) Heat the bearing aluminum housing up to ca 80 deg C (175 F, well below the glass temp of the surrounding plastic)
    2) Freeze the bearing and its aluminium mandrel in the (upside down turned) nozzle of an (upside down turned)
    CO2 extinguisher, releasing the liquid CO2 (inside at 20 deg C & 850 psi) to -78 deg C (-108 F).
    3) Drop the now smaller bearing & mandrel/ cold sink into the now biggie bearing seat.
    4) Clobber in place if needed.
    5) Rinse and repeat for the other side's bearing.

    If the above won't be sufficient to properly seat them - enter "2nd line of defense" M10 all-thread, bushings, nuts and tiiiighten.
    Whack/ tighten 'em and repeat 'til done.
    As of now, I don't feel any urge to make some adaptors to the Alfra 75 kN Hand Hydraulic punch press as a last resort.

    Anyone's suggestions, cautions on the above methods (i.e. freezing a bearing and then whacking it into place),
    or perhaps where I'll find any formulas for thermo-shrinking a 62 & 72 mm ball bearing at -78 deg C
    into an aluminium housing (@ +80 deg C) with a total temp diff of 160 deg C?


    Thanks for bearing with me (NO pun intended - seriously!) this far thru this long-winded, verbose and still unfinished thread.
    (My SWMBO secretly pities all you guys still standing after this barrage of words)

    Johan

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    Frank S's Tools
    One of the few times I strongly recommend wearing a pair of gloves if you have to touch the bearing you don't want your skin to freeze to the bearing.
    Roller bearings don't shrink as much as cylindrical steel sleeve bearings or tapered roller bearing outer shells but they will be reduced slightly in diameter. Pre making your mandrels always helps Also something to support the plastic housings as close as possible to where the bearings are to be pressed in is a must
    I hate having to press bearings into used plastic housings as I always find them to be brittle from use and age
    best of luck
    Never try to tell me it can't be done
    When I have to paint I use http://kbs.justoldtrucks.com/

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