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Thread: Foredom-Panavise carrier

  1. #1
    mklotz mklotz's Avatar
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    Foredom-Panavise carrier

    This is another one of my...

    Well, technically, it IS a tool, but, really, it's more of a suggestion/idea that you might want to put to use in your own shop.

    posts. I hope someone finds it useful.

    I have a Foredom flexible shaft tool. It's superior to Dremel-type tools in several ways...

    more powerful
    electrical switch reversible
    handpiece smaller and lighter than the typical Dremel tool
    handpiece has genuine Jacobs chuck - no fooling with collets when changing bits

    However, as with so many hand-held tools, it's often easier to get the job done by bringing the work to the tool rather than the tool to the work. What I needed was a third hand to hold the Foredom handpiece.

    I have a Panavise with the optional base that allows it to be clamped to the worktable...




    This ingenious mechanism allows the vise to be tilted and rotated to any angle. It's the perfect instrument for holding the Foredom handpiece. I've done it but there are problems. The 1" diameter handpiece has to sit up above the vise alignment bars so that the jaws clamp on the diameter. That's tricky and not terribly stable. I made a V-block to fit on the jaws but it was still a three-handed hassle to mount the handpiece. A further complication was the fact that I'm reluctant to close the jaws too tightly lest I mar or damage the handpiece. The Foredom bearing alignment is near perfect and I don't want to mess it up.

    So (finally he gets to the build), I took a piece of 1-7/16" steel and bored it out to a smooth, sliding fit (1") on the Foredom handpiece and fitted two 10-24 nylon screws to hold the handpiece in place.



    This handpiece carrier fits into the Panavise such that resting on (and thereby stabilized by) the Panavise alignment pins, the bottom edges of the vise jaws lock the carrier tightly in place. And, of course, with that thickness of steel, no amount of reefing on the Panavise is going to damage the handpiece.

    When all assembled it looks like this...




    I'm very happy with it. I can use both hands to hold small parts while I sand or debur them and the tool is always at just the right angle.
    Last edited by mklotz; 07-08-2017 at 03:33 PM.
    ---
    Regards, Marv


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    ALAN F (06-08-2016), C-Bag (06-03-2016), Komo (12-14-2017), lazarus (06-11-2016), oldcaptainrusty (12-13-2017), Paul Jones (05-31-2016), PJs (06-02-2016)

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    Thanks mklotz! We've added your Rotary Tool Vise Holder to our Miscellaneous category,
    as well as to your builder page: mklotz's Homemade Tools. Your receipt:




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    Marv,
    You're a busy guy!! Now that you've gone and done the hard part on the Foredom holder, go one more step and weld a piece of 1/2" x 3/4" (or whatever) onto the tube and you can put in your QCTP on the lathe and have a mini tool post grinder. I have found this arrangement to be useful and especially so if I'm trying to "machine" rubber parts. Hard rubber (stoppers and the like) grind quite well and you can get a decent finish.

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    mklotz mklotz's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ed T View Post
    Marv,
    You're a busy guy!! Now that you've gone and done the hard part on the Foredom holder, go one more step and weld a piece of 1/2" x 3/4" (or whatever) onto the tube and you can put in your QCTP on the lathe and have a mini tool post grinder. I have found this arrangement to be useful and especially so if I'm trying to "machine" rubber parts. Hard rubber (stoppers and the like) grind quite well and you can get a decent finish.
    Hi Ed,

    Great idea. I'd do it except for the fact I made a dedicated QCTP holder for the Foredom soon after I bought it. In fact, one of the reasons for buying the Foredom was the fact that it has better bearings than a Dremel and thus would produce a better surface finish on turned parts. I have a similar fitting for a Dremel so I could make a direct comparison.
    ---
    Regards, Marv


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    Turns out this Foredom is a pretty deep subject in that there are many models and price ranges are all over the place so it makes it hard for the uninitiated to make an informed choice. I saw one on the local CL and had no clue what it was or what it was worth. I would love to have something like this as I find the Dremel very underpowered and a little clunky. But perusing eBay it would seem either there has been an outsourcing to China of the company or there are copies being made there. I also have not seen one with a Jacobs Chuck which would also be very desirable IMHO.

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    mklotz mklotz's Avatar
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    This is the one I have...

    http://www.amazon.com/Foredom-Indust...Foredom+K.2272

    It's 1/6 HP and 18 KRPM max. The motor case is cast iron - very sturdy and no plastic in sight. It comes with a foot pedal to control speed. You may find, as I did, that the pedal is hard to manage while concentrating on what you're doing with the tool. I use a router speed controller which allows me to set and forget the speed. It also has a switch to select full or variable speed. By controlling the tool's on/off setting with the router control, it always turns on with exactly the same speed I set earlier whereas, with the pedal, one has to "hunt" the speed one was using.

    The #30 handpiece is what is typically supplied. It has a 5/32" Jacobs chuck. Foredom makes a bewildering variety of specialized handpieces but, for the kind of work most do, the #30 is more than adequate. Handpieces literally snap on/off the flexible shaft so swapping them is a two second job.

    There are basically two options for mounting the motor. It can be placed in a swiveling holder that sits on the bench or it can be hung from a carrier attached the front edge of the bench. I can't imagine using the former option because it would mean that the flexible shaft would be lashing around the bench top when the tool was used. If your bench looks like mine, you can appreciate what a disaster that would be.

    I use the latter option. Rather than buying the wimpy-looking hanger offered by Foredom, I repurposed a 1" pipe clamp. I drilled and tapped the end to take two sturdy eye-bolts cut down to make hooks. One supports the motor and one the speed controller. Magnets stuck to the pipe hold accessories. The whole thing is rock-steady.
    ---
    Regards, Marv


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    I bought a pair of 1/3hp clones on Ebay for $100 shipped & couldn't be happier. I have a real Foredom & I hate to say these have more power & work at least as well & the shafts & heads interchange. I just couldn't afford a real Foredom & took a chance on these.


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