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  1. #1
    [email protected] tonyfoale's Avatar
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    Inverting an hydraulic jack for a workshop press.

    This my first post here so I hope that I obey all the rules.
    There are a plethora of home-made and low end commercial workshop presses out there which use common one piece hydraulic jacks to generate the required force. However, all that I have seen use the jack in the normal upright position, they simply don't work upsidedown. I have always thought that there had to be a way of inverting a jack and removing the need for the extra moving parts usually seen on these presses.
    A one piece jack as bought has the pump part at the bottom so that its intake is submerged in oil but there has to be an air volume above the oil level to allow for the changing volume as the shaft exits and retracts in use. When inverted the air rises to what was the bottom and so the pump tries to pump air not oil. My first thought was that if I used an external oil reservoir and bled all the air out of the jack then the problem would be cured. On removal of the outer cylinder I saw another method that would be less sensitive to any entrapped air. I pressed a small hollow barb into the pump intake and extended it with some plastic hose. When inverted the open end of the hose is well submerged in the oil ensuring that the pump only sucks what it should. Rather than deciding between these two methods of allowing the jack to be inverted I decided to do both.

    Inverting an hydraulic jack for a workshop press.-original_inlet.jpg Inverting an hydraulic jack for a workshop press.-new_inlet_barb.jpg Inverting an hydraulic jack for a workshop press.-feed_pipe.jpg

    The above photos show the detail of fitting the new oil pickup for the pump. I also added a small wheel to the pressure relief screw for ease of operation. I still had to arrange for an oil feed and return to the reservoir tank. The feed was easy I just tapped for a connection where the original filling hole was. For the return I needed to tap in at the highest point to allow air out, for this I drilled two meeting holes at 90 deg. to each other and tapped the external hole for another connector as shown in the following.

    Inverting an hydraulic jack for a workshop press.-air_bleed.jpg Inverting an hydraulic jack for a workshop press.-air_bleed-fitting.jpg Inverting an hydraulic jack for a workshop press.-assembled_jack.jpg

    There was just one simple job left to complete the conversion. When you turn a jack upsidedown the action of the pump lever is reversed also. That is, you need to lift the handle to pump the jack. This isn't a natural nor effective way. Fortunately it is easy to fix this, just a question of putting the handle on the other side of the pivot mechanism and welding a stop on the appropriate side. Here it is and also the complete press which was made from stuff that I had lying around, note the Fiat header tank used for the reservoir. A typical HF press is also shown for comparison.

    Inverting an hydraulic jack for a workshop press.-operating_lever.jpg Inverting an hydraulic jack for a workshop press.-press_front.jpg Inverting an hydraulic jack for a workshop press.-press_full_frontal.jpg Inverting an hydraulic jack for a workshop press.-press_rear.jpg Inverting an hydraulic jack for a workshop press.-hf-junk.jpg

    I build and race classic motorcycles and a strong motivation for the press was to service built up crankshafts which have some very tight interference fits and a significant force is required. I was planning on getting a 20 ton jack but a racing friend had bought a HF pipe bender which was terrible for bending the thin walled tube which he wanted. So I bought it from him and used the 16 ton but long stroke jack for the press. I was hopeful that 16 tons would be OK and the long stroke was ideal for a press.
    In use the press has exceeded all expectations, it is not used daily but probably weekly and it is used for a lot more tasks than I envisaged. It is much more convenient to use than the rightwayup presses that I had previously used.

  2. The Following 14 Users Say Thank You to tonyfoale For This Useful Post:

    bigtrev8xl (12-27-2016), C-Bag (12-13-2016), EnginePaul (10-07-2017), j.bickley (12-26-2016), janders1957 (10-08-2017), Jon (12-13-2016), Lornie (01-10-2017), Moby Duck (12-26-2016), Oloneear (02-28-2017), Paul Jones (12-25-2016), PJs (12-14-2016), Seedtick (10-07-2017), sossol (12-26-2016), Toolmaker51 (12-13-2016)

  3. #2
    C-Bag's Avatar
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    Outstanding first post Tony! Thanks so much for posting this. You are so right that all the good presses I've used had an inverted ram and have often wondered what was difference from the cheap presses that have the ram upright. It so simplfies the whole construction to do away with mount system on cheap presses. Every once in a while I see an old barely used HF press on Craigslist but hated the setup. I'll now keep an eye out for one and convert it over to this setup.
    Last edited by C-Bag; 12-14-2016 at 09:38 AM.

  4. #3
    [email protected] tonyfoale's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by C-Bag View Post
    Outstanding first post Tony! Thanks so much for posting this. ...... I'll now keep an eye out now for one and convert it over to this setup.
    Glad you like it. I have a bunch more things to post about when I find odd moments to write them up. Some are workshop orientated like a homebuilt milling machine, unusual Tool and Cutter grinder etc. but many are specific to engines etc. like a flow bench, shock dyno, engine dyno, valve train dynamic tester and so on. then there is the electronic and software stuff to make them work. Here are some examples;

    Inverting an hydraulic jack for a workshop press.-smallmillasm-11.jpg Inverting an hydraulic jack for a workshop press.-tandc-grinder-05.jpg Inverting an hydraulic jack for a workshop press.-flowbench_01.jpg Inverting an hydraulic jack for a workshop press.-board_03.jpg Inverting an hydraulic jack for a workshop press.-img_0041s.jpg

  5. The Following 4 Users Say Thank You to tonyfoale For This Useful Post:

    DIYer (12-24-2016), Jon (12-15-2016), PJs (12-14-2016), Seedtick (10-07-2017)

  6. #4
    PJs
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    Welcome Tony and a Very nice first post. Great build on the press and recycled converted ram. Most impressive is the Flow Bench and the DP & Sensor boards associated. Couldn't tell what that head was off of (your Aremachhi?), but to build your own bench is impressive in my book. Would enjoy seeing more of that build! Is that bottom picture some kind of shock testing system...looks like some kind of strain sensor at the top there?

    Impressive and varied background and website too. Looking forward to seeing some of your other builds and contributions. Thanks for posting!! ~PJ
    ‘‘Always do right. This will gratify some people and astonish the rest.’’
    Mark Twain

  7. #5
    [email protected] tonyfoale's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by PJs View Post
    [B][I] Most impressive is the Flow Bench and the DP & Sensor boards associated. Couldn't tell what that head was off of (your Aremachhi?), but to build your own bench is impressive in my book. Would enjoy seeing more of that build! Is that bottom picture some kind of shock testing system...looks like some kind of strain sensor at the top there?
    Yes that's an Aermacchi head and the last pic. is a shock dyno. The shock dyno permits the measurement of fork and shock damper characteristics as in the graphs below. I'll post build details of both.

    Inverting an hydraulic jack for a workshop press.-ohlins_f_d_single-loop.jpg Inverting an hydraulic jack for a workshop press.-ohlins_f_v_single-loop.jpg

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    PJs (12-14-2016)

  9. #6
    PJs
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    Yes that's an Aermacchi head and the last pic. is a shock dyno. The shock dyno permits the measurement of fork and shock damper characteristics as in the graphs below. I'll post build details of both.
    Terrific! Thanks Tony. ~PJ
    ‘‘Always do right. This will gratify some people and astonish the rest.’’
    Mark Twain

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    Looking forward to seeing the flow bench!

  11. #8
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    Thanks tonyfoale! We've added your Workshop Press to our Brakes and Presses category,
    as well as to your builder page: tonyfoale's Homemade Tools. Your receipt:




  12. #9
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    Thanks tonyfoale! We've added your Hydraulic Jack Modification to our Jacks and Lifts category,
    as well as to your builder page: tonyfoale's Homemade Tools. Your receipt:




  13. #10
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    hello tony, seems to me the frame is a fabrication too, i imagine you`re really busy but if not much trouble can you comment on material and size? i`m about to make a press and would like to get on the correct path regarding to this. thanks man.
    been following your work for years (and i mean years... )
    regards

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