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  1. #1
    Jon
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    NASA Technical Publication: Can you weld on Mars?

    Can you weld on Mars? I'm uh, asking for a friend.

    In this publication, NASA researchers examine the feasibility of arc welding on Mars. Welds were performed in a simulated Martian atmosphere, then analyzed with a variety of methods.

    Full publication: Mars Atmosphere Effects on Arc Welds: Phase 1











    Full publication: Mars Atmosphere Effects on Arc Welds: Phase 1

    Previously:

    NASA technical standard document: Crimping, Interconnecting Cables, Harnesses, Wiring
    NASA Tire Assault Vehicle (TAV), made from a German World War II tank model
    NASA fastener design manual
    astronaut loses $100,000 tool bag during spacewalk
    International Space Station tools
    English/metric measurement error in the Mars Climate Orbiter

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    Seedtick (09-09-2017)

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    Frank S's Avatar
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    They may find that the duel shield wire that I use with CO2 as a shielding gas may be the better choice but since they will be welding aluminum or titanium the formulation of the wire would be all wrong they would need a flux cores aluminum wire or use coated stick electrodes maintaining a post weld heating process behind the arc would also serve to normalize the weld to slow the actual freezing of the weld puddle while relieving the internal stresses in the weld at the same time
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    Excellent post Frank S. Absolutely makes sense.

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    A welder will figure out how to effectively create a weld process that will make a strong bond.
    there is no gap too wide, no crack too tight, no metal too soft, and none too hard, no alloy too exotic that a way to weld 2 pieces together can not be found.
    We have the technology to create a large lab with the exact atmospheric conditions as those on Mars that we know o f from the several probes that have been sent there, gravitational strength excepted.
    Just build a facility such as Earth dome 2 structurally strengthened to handle the difference of pressure between that of the Earth and Mars, Recreate as many conditions that will be found on Mars as possible, find a couple of old hand welders with a solid back ground in metallurgy if you can convene them to wear and work in all of their PPE provide them with everything they request. And I'll bet they would come up with an acceptable weld process long before anyone can build a transport ship capable of carrying a team to the red planet.
    Never try to tell me it can't be done
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    NortonDommi (09-10-2017)

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    Frank S has it sussed, not much beats experience especially when your life may depend on the outcome.
    Came across this in an industry E-mail and I would dearly love to have a play with it.
    https://www.laserstar.net/laserstar-..._hsmi=56121633

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    Quote Originally Posted by NortonDommi View Post
    Frank S has it sussed, not much beats experience especially when your life may depend on the outcome.
    Came across this in an industry E-mail and I would dearly love to have a play with it.
    https://www.laserstar.net/laserstar-..._hsmi=56121633
    I want one. when I think back at all of the tedious hours spent tig welding up tiny little scratches with the smallest cup a very sharp pointed 1/16" tungsten .o23 wire while trying to balance the right amount of heat and filler applied to them so machining would be minimal.
    I really appreciated the near perfect flow lines created along the beads in the video.
    Never try to tell me it can't be done
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    NortonDommi's Avatar
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    It's not only rebuilding a worn edge but the ability to build sections also leads to picking the right metallurgy for the job exactly where it is needed. What really got my attention was the apparent lack of heat. Pretty sure the operator would have been wearing gloves if there was radiation and judging by how close he was holding that filler rod the heat was minimal at least.
    One is on my list of things to buy when I win Lotto.

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    Does this technology have some kind of tracking ability, to follow the filler wire and bead? I didn't see any method of the operator knowing where the laser was going to be applying the heat, yet the welds, and subsequent smoothing of imperfections (jealous!!) in some of them, were awesome!

  12. #9
    Frank S's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Metalmuncher View Post
    Does this technology have some kind of tracking ability, to follow the filler wire and bead? I didn't see any method of the operator knowing where the laser was going to be applying the heat, yet the welds, and subsequent smoothing of imperfections (jealous!!) in some of them, were awesome!
    Note the operator sitting and viewing the weld area through and optic viewer his left hand is on the dial like that of a milling machine
    NASA Technical Publication: Can you weld on Mars?-laser-welding.jpg

    Last edited by Frank S; 09-14-2017 at 09:54 PM.
    Never try to tell me it can't be done
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    Quote Originally Posted by Frank S View Post
    Note the operator sitting and viewing the weld area through and optic viewer his right hand is on the dial like that of a milling machine
    You know, I did see that, but then got so engrossed in the beautiful welding I totally forgot about it. Thanks for explaining. So does he see like a red dot or something in the viewer, or maybe crosshairs? I'm not certain, but from the video I got the impression that a dark welding shield is not needed? Or was the camera dealing with the flash?

    After welding for years (home use) with a stick welder, I sprung for a MIG, and was totally amazed at how there is no smoke or spatter when gas and solid core wire is used. I still wear gloves and protective gear though. But I've noticed on some of the TV shows these guys MIG weld in tee shirts without even wearing gloves. To me, this laser welding is the same kind of huge leap forward in making welding a pleasant experience, not to mention much more accurately controlled. I did notice, though, that the laser welding technique is rather like "dragging" the MIG wire instead of "pushing", which I read was the best way to do it. Maybe laser welding is more akin to how gas welding works, albeit much finer and prettier?

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