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Thread: Bagger 293 bucket wheel excavator GIF

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    Jon
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    Bagger 293 bucket wheel excavator GIF

    Bagger 293, an enormous bucket-wheel excavator among the largest vehicles in the world.


    https://s3-us-west-1.amazonaws.com/h...bagger_293.gif


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    Seedtick (Jan 8, 2017)

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    Supporting Member Hemi's Avatar
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    Hemi's Tools
    I believe this enormous machine is in Germany! And if I read correctly, the thing only has 3 operators in it! WOW....

    The thing that I ask myself is why? Is it to remove topsoil to do mining? -I can't see, nor find a reason for anything quite that big in the USA!!!! UNLESS its mid-West mining!

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    I saw, up close, this machine or similar in Germany working in 1989 and visited with one of the operators.
    It ran on 4140 VAC 3 phase power and they were removing about 70 ft of topsoil (planted farmland!) and loaded all that topsoil on a LONG conveyer taking it about 12 miles away. Then they removed another layer, again about 70 ft thick and conveyed it away. After the coal was removed they brought all the topsoil back and restored the farmland, albeit at a somewhat lower altitude. That was one reason electricity was so expensive, even hallway lights in hotels were on timers. You had to get to the next button down the hall to reset the timer before you were left in the dark! I guessed the digging wheels to be at least 40 feet in diameter. It was a sight I'll never forget.

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    Toolmaker51 (Feb 14, 2021)

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    Scaled against vehicles near the cutter's perspective, I'd guess 40' a very conservative estimate.
    Yup. ~ 70'! 18 scoops of almost 20 cu yards each.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bagger_293
    Sincerely,
    Toolmaker51
    ...we'll learn more by wandering than searching...

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    Well the one I saw had to be quite a bit earlier (and smaller) than the 293 as I saw it in 1989 when we were visiting our son who was stationed in Bamberg at the time. We were there with our other son and father-in law and sister-in-law,the six of us playing tourists. It had to be the Bagger 285 (1975), Bagger 287 (1976), Bagger 288 (1978). so it was most likely smaller. Still an incredible machine!
    I suppose there are numerous photos somewhere in the bowels of the basement but as I am "organizationally challenged" I wouldn't know where to start looking.

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    Toolmaker51 (Feb 14, 2021)

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    Quote Originally Posted by the harmonious blacksmith View Post
    Well the one I saw had to be quite a bit earlier (and smaller) than the 293 as I saw it in 1989 when we were visiting our son who was stationed in Bamberg at the time. We were there with our other son and father-in law and sister-in-law,the six of us playing tourists. It had to be the Bagger 285 (1975), Bagger 287 (1976), Bagger 288 (1978). so it was most likely smaller. Still an incredible machine!
    I suppose there are numerous photos somewhere in the bowels of the basement but as I am "organizationally challenged" I wouldn't know where to start looking.
    Not fact-checking you, [so popular these days] the harmonious blacksmith, just curious about the immensity shown in Gif and pix.
    And organizationally challenged, I know the poster girl.



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    Toolmaker51
    ...we'll learn more by wandering than searching...

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