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Thread: Forklift safety lights - GIF

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    johncg (Nov 14, 2021), nova_robotics (Nov 17, 2021), Rangi (Nov 18, 2021), werdegast (Nov 13, 2021)

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    Potentially useful as a warning to others the fork-lift operator may not see them, but also a potential causation factor for fork-lift collisions if the operator expects everyone to stay out of the hazard zone and stops looking, one of the known 'human factors' in many workplace incidents (I won't call them accidents) involves perception of hazards to ones self, this would dovetail neatly into that area.

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    nova_robotics's Tools
    I'm used to blue ones. But like a big spot light behind the forklift. I like the projected square that produces a perimeter around the machine. Red-green is the most common form of color blindness. I'd be worried about the color of the projected light, but otherwise it seems like a decent improvement on the current system.

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    My vote goes to cautious, observant operators first, next, to personnel in operating area.
    As if your toes versus 8000 pounds of moving bright safety paint isn't enough.
    Sincerely,
    Toolmaker51
    ...we'll learn more by wandering than searching...

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    Supporting Member NeiljohnUK's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Toolmaker51 View Post
    My vote goes to cautious, observant operators first, next, to personnel in operating area.
    As if your toes versus 8000 pounds of moving bright safety paint isn't enough.
    100%, as a the guy behind me waiting at the tool crib hatch found out, safety boot steel toe caps crush and damage toes when a forklift runs over them.

    My youngest did his forklift ticket recently, 40 minutes max to do various tasks practical done in 30 with one minor observation, didn't straighten his rear steer before lifting once, another guy did the test in ~20 mins, with one more fault he'd have failed the whole course. Youngest put it down to me telling the tool crib story the night before the test and telling him taking it smooth and safe with good observation always is best, so every move was done with that in mind, along with dock edge safety, not just loading docks but Naval docks...

    I didn't tell him about the incident investigation I'd been involved in (as an investigator) involving a pedestrian operated (walk behind) light duty forklift, the 'operator' had made up some untested fork extensions out of loose fitting box section steel and was using them to lift off a crate ~ max lift capacity, it would have been fine if it'd been small enough to sit on the standard forks close to the mast, but the CoG and extension meant when it cleared the trucks deck it tipped the forklift forward, lifting the braked/driven/steering wheels off the ground and shot it backwards, if it weren't for the internal corner of the building stopping it it would have killed the operator not just broke his leg.

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    Toolmaker51 (Nov 18, 2021)

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    Supporting Member Toolmaker51's Avatar
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    Or a personal friend, horsing around in a small lift, with smaller brother, trying to spin donuts.
    It tipped over.
    He saved child by kicking him out, but wound up pinned, one leg under flat sides of lift.
    Months of rehab, finished vocational education classes in wheel chair.
    Ambulatory now, with limp, medications and continual pain.
    Happened just months before his childhood dream of enlisting US Navy, he'd of made E8 in no time.

    That urn I posted; it is his Dad, so completely familiar with this young man.
    Sincerely,
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    ...we'll learn more by wandering than searching...

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    Quote Originally Posted by Toolmaker51 View Post
    My vote goes to cautious, observant operators first, next, to personnel in operating area.
    In a perfect world I'd agree with you, but a forklift operator cannot see in front of a large load. They need a spotter, and most plants I've been don't require a spotter. Also people on foot round blind corners and just pop out in front of moving equipment. It happens a lot. The forklift operator can't help that. I wish people were more attentive but that's just reality.

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    Agreed, 101%.
    Lifts are supposed to back up with anything obscuring view to front. Pedestrians are an issue, even when looking backward, there is always 180 of blindspot.
    One responsibility I had was in-plant transportation of VERY special products; via battery lift trucks, flat bed electric carts etc, within 3 million+ square foot facility among 3,000 employees. ANY incident was regarded driver error, that I never incurred. Can't guess miles at the wheel in there, but many days pedometer recorded 6 and 7 miles of walking.
    Flashing lights, horns, bells buzzers, wide and narrow aisles aren't enough; but supreme entertainment when walker's expression says you sneaked (snuck?) up on them.
    Now, two wheeled kick scooters are used; carries a trunk, and little trailer on equally slick ball bearing wheels.
    Sincerely,
    Toolmaker51
    ...we'll learn more by wandering than searching...

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    Quote Originally Posted by Toolmaker51 View Post
    Flashing lights, horns, bells buzzers, wide and narrow aisles aren't enough; but supreme entertainment when walker's expression says you sneaked (snuck?) up on them.
    Ah the curse of ear-bud's, often hidden inside ear muffs, and mobile phone like distraction devices...



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