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Thread: Homemade metal nibbler stand - video

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    Jon
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    Homemade metal nibbler stand - video

    Homemade metal nibbler stand. By JSK-koubou. 14:38 video:




    Previously:

    Homemade table saw push block - video
    Homemade angle grinder sliding cutting jig - video

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    Great idea, I wanted to use mine for metal artwork but my hands aren’t strong enough any more. This will make it a lot easier. I was thinking his tools and way of doing this were overkill until I saw the Japanese soda can.

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    Supporting Member high-side's Avatar
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    I've never used one of these. Does this tool have any advantage over a vertical metal-cutting band saw?
    Pat

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    Supporting Member thehomeengineer's Avatar
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    thehomeengineer's Tools
    great video and ideas thank you
    The Home Engineer

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    Supporting Member Beserkleyboy's Avatar
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    Beserkleyboy's Tools
    Pat, yea, it probably does. I have only used hand knibblers for cutting corrugated steel roofing sheets, and they work a treat...even if the do leave a blanket of crescent shaped swarf on the ground that is nearly magnetic. The advantage is clean shear cutting that leaves an undistorted, straight edge, sharp as...cheers
    Jim in a beautiful spring day, Sth Cst NSW

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    wizard69's Tools
    That is one excellent machine tool idea and a great bit of wood working. The only thing missing is a small motor and a belt drive to the nibbler. That machine joy to keep the drill free.

    this generated all sorts of ideas in my head to make use of die filer mechanisms to build DIY.

    by the way I loved all of those DIY tools seen in the video.

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    wizard69's Tools
    Quote Originally Posted by high-side View Post
    I've never used one of these. Does this tool have any advantage over a vertical metal-cutting band saw?
    All I’ve used is hand nibblers which are obviously a lot slower. In the main nibblers (in this class anyways) are light sheet metal tools where as bandsaws don’t really do sheet metal well. More importantly unless you break and weld the hand, bandsaws don’t do closed internal holes.

    in any event nibblers are rather common in electronics shops doing sheet metal chassis work. They can be used to nibble out a square hole from a round drilled or punched hole. You can the fit switches, controllers, displays or whatever in those cut outs. The reality not other way to get a similarly clean hole would be to use a punch. Punches are expensive and you never have the right one. Of course in production or a well equipped modern shop you are just as likely to use a laser, water jet or other CNC tool. But for small runs, field retrofits or hard to access areas nibblers are great.

    I love this forum and see tools that range from I don’t need that to wow why didn’t I think of that. This is most certainly a very strong why didn’t I think of that! As simple as this is, the idea would make a lot of DIY sheet metal projects so much easier.


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