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Thread: Ice break training - GIF

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    baja (Nov 26, 2019), drum365 (Nov 26, 2019), Seedtick (Nov 25, 2019)

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    Supporting Member Frank S's Avatar
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    Took him longer to figure out to use his ski poles than you would expect.
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    Supporting Member Slim-123's Avatar
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    Мне кажется что он испытал шок от холодной воды.

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    Supporting Member Frank S's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Slim-123 View Post
    Мне кажется что он испытал шок от холодной воды.
    Yes sudden immersion in very cold water can induce shock and disorientation. His not immediate trying to seek out the corner or even trying to use his poles on the side where he first swam to tells me that he was not ready for the training exercise. he had either not learned or failed to listen to his instructor during his dry training classes
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    drum365's Avatar
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    The entry will look familiar to any lifeguard. We call it a stride jump - arms extended to the side, one leg forward, one leg back, scissors the leg together and press down with the arms as you enter the water. The idea is to be able to jump into a pool from a lifeguard chair and keep your eyes above water so you can see the victim the whole time. Of course, we're not doing it into freezing water with boots, a backpack and heavy winter clothes. I wonder how much that pack weighs?

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    Supporting Member Frank S's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by drum365 View Post
    The entry will look familiar to any lifeguard. We call it a stride jump - arms extended to the side, one leg forward, one leg back, scissors the leg together and press down with the arms as you enter the water. The idea is to be able to jump into a pool from a lifeguard chair and keep your eyes above water so you can see the victim the whole time. Of course, we're not doing it into freezing water with boots, a backpack and heavy winter clothes. I wonder how much that pack weighs?
    probably around 70 lbs but I noticed that it did float, which doesn't mean much as 62 lbs per cuft would be near neutral buoyancy and it was clearly over a couple of cu ft in volume
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    Supporting Member Duke_of_URL's Avatar
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    First thing that happens when the cold water hits your groin is you stop breathing and you can go into cold water shock. We learned in Arctic training that no one can beat heat loss from your core in cold water. It's not something you can train your body to get better at. Once you're in the cold water you only have 10 minutes before you start to lose muscle control to hands, feet, arms, and the harder you fight the greater the loss of heat from your core. In 1 hour you develop hypothermia and die. Once that soldier is out of the water the first thing he must do is strip naked and jump into snow to dry off then wrap in a dry blanket and fresh fatigues. Keeping wet clothes on greatly increases heat loss versus cold dry air.

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    Supporting Member Frank S's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Duke_of_URL View Post
    First thing that happens when the cold water hits your groin is you stop breathing and you can go into cold water shock. We learned in Arctic training that no one can beat heat loss from your core in cold water. It's not something you can train your body to get better at. Once you're in the cold water you only have 10 minutes before you start to lose muscle control to hands, feet, arms, and the harder you fight the greater the loss of heat from your core. In 1 hour you develop hypothermia and die. Once that soldier is out of the water the first thing he must do is strip naked and jump into snow to dry off then wrap in a dry blanket and fresh fatigues. Keeping wet clothes on greatly increases heat loss versus cold dry air.
    no you can not train to beat heat loss, Cold is going to get you eventually no matter what. that being said what you do though is you condition your mind and your bodies reflexes not to place you into involuntary shock at the instant your body senses cold. A strong cremaster reflex helps because that will pull the boys up into the inaugural canal And anyone who has studied a few of the more advanced martial arts understands the cremaster muscle can be strengthened and the reflex can be improved some can even will the reflex into action.
    People who are more at home living in sub zero temperatures are genetically different than people who live in the deserts the same as those who live in hot humid regions.
    Artic training is more about learning how to survive and function in sub zero the same as desert training neither is about learning to live in either region for very long periods of time.
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    (Please excuse my use of Imperial system measurements)

    I believe it was the British Air Force (or Navy?), in a post-WWII study of downed pilots, that formulated the "50-50-50" rule: in 50 degree water, 50 percent of your victims will be dead in 50 minutes.

    But open water swimmers can swim for hours in water in the high 50s to low 60s. There are a lot of adaptations associated with regular cold-water training: mitigating the shock response, changes in heart rate and blood circulation, brown fat deposition and raised core temperature to name a few. The heat from muscle exertion also helps keep the body warm, especially the core. And just like most other sports, open water swimming selects for certain genetic characteristics. (Think basketball and height.)

    Also, FWIW, it's one of the few sports where women compete equally with men.

    Of course I'm talking here about water in the high 50s - I'm not sure how any of this applies to temperatures in the low 30s. But Lynne Cox swam for over two hours in 42 water when she crossed the Bering Strait. Most of us would have been dead in a matter of minutes.



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