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Thread: Perfect controlled demolition of twin chimneys - video

  1. #21
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    I saw this chimney take down about 2 years ago on another site. All I can say this guy is lucky to be alive, there is a much saver way to take down a chimney

  2. #22
    Supporting Member Frank S's Avatar
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    A friend of mine has a PC200 with that exact same cab. his machine fell through a slab into a basement that no one knew was there. His cab hung on the edge of a wall and the floor almost as much damage as the one in the picture except the impact was on the front corner broke all of the glass out and destroyed the door He never bothered having the cab repaired just uses it without glass and removed the door.
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    Supporting Member ranald's Avatar
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    looks like the boom may have helped but a seriously good design rops frame in the cab. very lucky fella.

  4. #24
    Jon
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    We may never see a demolition as beautiful as those twin chimneys, but that doesn't mean we can't spend the rest of our days looking. I didn't realize silos can demo this cleanly:



    Different silo, but a similar collapse pattern. Unusual detonation method, and this one is appropriately doodled:


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    Supporting Member mklotz's Avatar
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    Why are there so many videos of silo demolitions? Do silos wear out or become infected or something? The amount of land they occupy on farms of considerable acreage seems minimal. They must be moderately expensive to construct so, even if unused, why destroy it? Won't they be value added when the farm is sold?
    Last edited by mklotz; 10-11-2018 at 01:40 PM.
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    The farmers and grain storage people use metal silos easier to maintain

  8. #27
    Supporting Member Frank S's Avatar
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    Marv, you may note that almost all of them are either block construction or galvanized corrugated sheet metal that are being destroyed with a few exceptions of the random reinforced concrete silos.
    the mortar used it the block silos deteriorates or the ground they are sitting on sometimes settles causing them to develop cracks once this happens they are more of a liability than an asset. the ones made out of sheet metal naturally rust out over time creating a liability.
    The well constructed poured reinforced concrete silos are probably only demolished should they develop very large cracks or simply the farm owner decides he is tired of looking at it. or tired or having to have it included on his insurance policy. but mostly if it is not being used he still has to pay property taxes on having the thing.
    in some states or counties that can really ad up over time especially in states or counties that add an overall height tax to the structures on a property. This is why taxes are at a higher rate for 2 or 3 story homes of the same square footage of roof than single story units of the same size, In those areas the tall slender silo can near equal the amount of tax owed as their barn due to its height.
    Never try to tell me it can't be done
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  10. #28
    Supporting Member marksbug's Avatar
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    somehow I dont see me being able to do that....well not that nicely.

  11. #29
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    A farmer in Michigan has no restrictions on what he builds no permits are required but has to pay taxes, that may also be true in the rest of our country

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    Here in central ny I have heard 2nd hand that insurance companys will no longer cover silos. On the large, 1000 head and bigger farms bunkering silage is most common. The volume of silage is just totaly impractal to put in silos. Also just backing up and dumping a load and "stacking" it with an articulated tractor with a degelman blade is likely much faster. Often farmers sell their block silos to the amish who put them back up with a smaller diameter so several families get a small silo out of one larger one.
    Eric

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