Free 173 Best Homemade Tools eBook:  
Become a founding member: 500+ tool plans, full site access, and more.

User Tag List

Page 1 of 3 1 2 3 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 21

Thread: Strapping down your roof for a hurricane - photo

  1. #1
    Jon
    Jon is offline Jon has agreed the Seller's Terms of Service
    Administrator
    Supporting Member
    Jon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Colorado, USA
    Posts
    21,344
    Thanks
    6,489
    Thanked 30,803 Times in 8,544 Posts

    Strapping down your roof for a hurricane - photo

    Strapping down your roof for a hurricane. Is this a thing? Do people do this? We don't really have hurricanes where I live.


    173 Best Homemade Tools eBook

  2. The Following 9 Users Say Thank You to Jon For This Useful Post:

    carloski (Jun 7, 2021), EnginePaul (Sep 14, 2018), Frank S (Sep 14, 2018), PJs (Sep 15, 2018), ranald (Sep 15, 2018), rossbotics (Sep 17, 2018), Scotsman Hosie (Mar 13, 2019), Seedtick (Sep 14, 2018), Toolmaker51 (Sep 14, 2018)

  3. #2
    Supporting Member Toolmaker51's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2016
    Location
    Midwest USA
    Posts
    3,586
    Thanks
    5,537
    Thanked 2,287 Times in 1,422 Posts

    Toolmaker51's Tools
    Those are the 4" straps used on full size semi-trailers. I'd wager 24 of them, minimum. At $11.00 USD~ = $260+. Not including at least 8 ratchets. $30.00+

    My solution, more entertaining. Way less expensive too.
    Strapping down your roof for a hurricane - photo-why_not.jpg
    Sincerely,
    Toolmaker51
    ...we'll learn more by wandering than searching...

  4. The Following User Says Thank You to Toolmaker51 For This Useful Post:

    PJs (Sep 15, 2018)

  5. #3
    Supporting Member Frank S's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2015
    Location
    Peacock TX
    Posts
    7,150
    Thanks
    907
    Thanked 5,634 Times in 2,690 Posts

    Frank S's Tools
    TM 51 if that were the case we should name all future Hurricanes after her
    Jon in answer to your question yes people who live in Hurricane zones will try most anything to try and protect their property. The problem most don't realize is if they try to strap their roofs down such as that person has done. if it is a composition roof the straps can only protect right where they are holding things down But I think most are concerned that the wind will get under the overhang of the roof and rip decking and all off the shingles can be easily replaced but if the decking goes then the whole house will be a write off. Note they also have what looks like 2x4's along the edge.
    If they would replace their soffit and fascia with a 1 piece formed aluminum or steel trim that extends over the decking 18" then replace their composition roof with formed steel standing seam roofing, with triple the amount of the proper securement fastenings the only thing they would have to worry about then wold be to shutter their windows and glass doors Plus they would be adding a significant fire protection
    But one other thing is so many who live in Hurricane prone areas also live down low. their houses are right on the ground in low elevations where storm surges or even a slightly heavy rain fall will flood them. That's just crazy to me. The only way I wold ever be caught living near the ocean would be in a house made of concrete and the ground floor would not be any part of the actual living quarters
    Last edited by Frank S; Sep 14, 2018 at 06:40 PM.
    Never try to tell me it can't be done
    When I have to paint I use http://kbs.justoldtrucks.com/

  6. The Following User Says Thank You to Frank S For This Useful Post:

    Toolmaker51 (Sep 15, 2018)

  7. #4
    Supporting Member Tuomas's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2016
    Location
    Jyväskylä Finland
    Posts
    809
    Thanks
    544
    Thanked 1,711 Times in 490 Posts

    Tuomas's Tools
    Strapping down your roof for a hurricane - photo-fb_img_1536990099218.jpg

    Kinda fits the theme.

  8. The Following 5 Users Say Thank You to Tuomas For This Useful Post:

    PJs (Sep 15, 2018), ranald (Sep 15, 2018), Scotsman Hosie (Mar 13, 2019), thevillageinn (Sep 17, 2018), Toolmaker51 (Sep 15, 2018)

  9. #5
    PJs
    PJs is offline
    Supporting Member PJs's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2014
    Location
    Northern CA
    Posts
    1,841
    Thanks
    8,322
    Thanked 1,097 Times in 712 Posts

    PJs's Tools
    My guess is this wouldn't work and a band-aid at best and at worst could cause more issues.

    Those stakes in the ground would need to be in at an angle perpendicular to the roof pitch and my guess is at least 2' long and in good Earth...the water will soften it from surge or the shear amount of water dropped at Velocity. As for the roof straps the straps themselves might hold up providing the Harmonics generated from the horrific wind and rain torrents of the unsullied portions of the straps turning out frequencies that crumble the house and loosening the soil the stakes are in even more. Might be interesting music though.

    Then there is the truss spacing to the straps...doesn't look good to me and like Frank says if the sheeting comes loose its over. Not only that but loading on specific trusses from the straps would probably create buckles in other portions of the sheeting and roof tiles and may effect too much point specific loading on the substructure. As long as the hurricane isn't a direct strike of any thing over a tropical storm...Maybe...but I'd be looking for cracks in the walls at a minimum after...on a stucco house to boot.

    One other thought is the Power Pole and Xformer in the back; depending on the origin of the hurricane, a clockwise rotation may just throw that Xformer directly into the house and a 200lb Xformer at say ~40-60mph...stucco, framing, wood roof...none would likely weather that storm, well. I've seen the wake of Tornado's in person after it bounced over our trailer park and was chased by a cyclone leaving Alabama...Best you can do imho, is pucker up and get low or not be there in the first place (says someone living in earthquake country). Mother nature in full force makes a Rorschach symbol out of most places we build.

    PJ
    ‘‘Always do right. This will gratify some people and astonish the rest.’’
    Mark Twain

  10. The Following User Says Thank You to PJs For This Useful Post:

    Toolmaker51 (Sep 15, 2018)

  11. #6

    Join Date
    Jun 2016
    Posts
    4
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post

    hurricane tie downs for the roof?

    Quote Originally Posted by Jon View Post
    Strapping down your roof for a hurricane. Is this a thing? Do people do this? We don't really have hurricanes where I live.

    Yes! Necessity is the mother of invention. Better to be safe than sorry,etc.
    Born and raised in Daytona Beach,Fl. So Yes. Whatever it takes

  12. #7
    Supporting Member ranald's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2018
    Location
    Black Mountain Queensland
    Posts
    1,302
    Thanks
    947
    Thanked 352 Times in 245 Posts

    ranald's Tools
    I'm unable to comment on hurricanes but similar to Cyclones in southern hemisphere. Cyclones mostly give most damage to houses by the lifting motion or sucking up so homes built in Queensland since the eighties have had some cyclone rating structural work engineered according to the risk of exposure. The nearer the coast generally means a higher rating like many above 51 metres per second wind whereas further inland may only have a cyclone rating of 40 metres per second or less. As the rating goes higher, so does the size of the cyclone rods (long threaded rod that connects the footings to the roof structure) and other tie downs. Internal walls that brace against the possible wind direction also have rods or if in a lower cat rating may only have starter bars (or bolts). Its all about keeping the whole house tied together & secured to the earth. The size of roof battens increase, length of roofing screws, closeness of trusses etc. An "inspector" checking the house I was owner building in the late eighties exclaimed "you don't need to do that" refering to the sleel rods I was tieing from the footings to the reinforcing mesh of the slab. My response was "I know: but this is my own house". He nodded and walked off. The few dollars & time spent on unseen structural improvements were a "peace of mind" for me.

    I have seen homes that have lost or broken a tile or two & emergency workers have done more damage climbing all over the roof to place a temperory tarp over the roof with similar tie downs or even much lighter ones.

    During the 60's I was holidaying with my parents in northern Qld when a cyclone hit the coastal areas causing flooding hundreds of miles inland. It was like we were travelling in the eye and totalling missing all the carnage as we travelled north & then back south towards home. cars were thrown and washed off the highway, big gumtrees down everywhere,roads flooded, roofs blown away etc. What was particularly interesting was at Cannonvale (near Earlie Beach, Whitsundays ((Barrier Reaf delight)) the houses at low flats near the sea were mostly all destroyed whereas the really expensive (to construct) ones on top of the ridge (couple of hundred metres higher) immediately behind those destroyed were completely ok. The theory is that the wind up high hit the ridge and eddied down the almost vertical slope to doubly impact on the flats below. I would have thought, until I witnessed that, that the more exposed ones on top would have suffered more but "there you go".

  13. The Following User Says Thank You to ranald For This Useful Post:

    PJs (Sep 16, 2018)

  14. #8
    Supporting Member IAMSatisfied's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Location
    The desolate ranch country of Northeastern corner of New Mexico, USA
    Posts
    365
    Thanks
    255
    Thanked 191 Times in 111 Posts
    The edges of a roof are the most vulnerable part when it comes to wind damage. What they're doing with the straps is simply keeping the drip-edge of the roof from getting peeled up and tearing the whole layer off shingles with it. The straps are holding 2x4s or 2x6s on the drip-edges to help prevent wind from getting underneath. This is also helping strengthen the eaves against wind-lift. These measures are a physical form of insurance and not a guarantee against damage. Every little bit helps... better safe than sorry.

  15. #9
    Supporting Member suther51's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2016
    Posts
    372
    Thanks
    197
    Thanked 145 Times in 111 Posts
    While I do not live in a hurricane area i have heard of doing this with mobile homes. Localy I have seen a mobile home torn to shreds by straight line winds. Owners belongings spread across a hay field, makes one pause.
    Eric

  16. #10
    Supporting Member Frank S's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2015
    Location
    Peacock TX
    Posts
    7,150
    Thanks
    907
    Thanked 5,634 Times in 2,690 Posts

    Frank S's Tools
    A long time ago I used to live in a mobile home park everyone there had dozens of old tires littered about on their roofs.
    Never try to tell me it can't be done
    When I have to paint I use http://kbs.justoldtrucks.com/

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •