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Thread: Vintage work crew photos

  1. #2721
    Supporting Member IntheGroove's Avatar
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    Appears they are making rectangular field coils...

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    Is this the plant that was on Genesee street in Buffalo next to the airport? That plant assembled planes during WW II.

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  3. #2723
    Jon
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    Workers at the information room at Union Station. Chicago, IL. January, 1943.

    Fullsize image: https://diqn32j8nouaz.cloudfront.net...1_fullsize.jpg


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    Thank You. Mr Mikey.

  5. #2725
    Jon
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    Steam drill workers. Vermont, 1905.

    Fullsize image: https://diqn32j8nouaz.cloudfront.net...6_fullsize.jpg


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    Steam Drill Workers doing something I don't have a clue what. Does anyone know.

    Ok Now But what does a Steam Drill Worker Actually Do? Are they drilling holes with a steam powered jack hammer device or what? I'm itching to know. I never heard or seen such a thing.



    [/QUOTE]

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    From Goggle
    A steam drill is powered by a remote boiler while a length of steel hammered away at the rock face. It took the ingenuity of an American inventor named Simon Ingersoll in 1871 to come up with a device that rotated as well, effectively creating the first hammer drill.

    Whilst they dont really appear to be working a "rock face" I dont know enough, (actually SFA) about this to comment further

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    Torque Tube??

    And What does a Torque Tube actually do? Does the Driveshaft sit inside the Tube? Would Modern Cars benefit from haveing this??

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    Well Thanks Anyway But once you hear The Name Ingersoll Rand Say No More! A Remote Boiler, There must be Hoses to each Power Dril. And you can see some workkers standing on their machines to increase "The Rate of Penetration" I'd like to see one in a Machine Museum. Thx

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    Quote Originally Posted by mcthistle007 View Post
    And What does a Torque Tube actually do? Does the Driveshaft sit inside the Tube? Would Modern Cars benefit from haveing this??
    Not sure where this question came from, but...early vehicles used leaf springs for suspension. On acceleration, the rear axle would try to twist (torque) upward as the pinion tries to climb up the ring gear. The leaf springs had trouble resisting this twist. During braking, the axle would try to twist downward. The drive shaft was inside the ridgid torque tube. The tube was attached securely to the rear axle and the engine/transmission. The tube served as a long lever which transferred the torque forward to prevent the axle from twisting on acceleration or braking. The tube makes servicing the drive train more difficult, they are also not strong enough for heavy duty applications.

    Many installed "ladder bars" on 1960's "muscle cars" to prevent the leaf springs from "wrapping" up when drag racing. They are still used today in many applications. Modern cars have totally different suspension systems would not benefit from a torque tube. If you look at heavy trucks, you will see solid bars leading forward from the axle to resist the twisting action.

    Last (only) car I had with a torque tube was a '53 Chevy. I bought it for $25.00, because a guy told me the transmission would fit my '60 chevy. It did not run, so we towed it home with a rope, then discovered the transmission would not work. One of my first really stupid ideas. My dad was sure mad when he got home. But I learned from the experience.

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