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Thread: Inexpensive heavy dusty adjustable feet for table jig or bench

  1. #1
    hardtail69's Avatar
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    Inexpensive heavy dusty adjustable feet for table jig or bench

    OK so all of these things use the same idea. Namely heavy duty, affordable, adjustable feet for any table bench or jig. Simply get a hold of some 1"-8 x 2-1/2" bolts and the nuts to match. Here in NC we have a scrap metal place that sells them for about 50 cents a piece,for the nut and bolt. The nut is the perfect size flat to flat to slip into 2" square tubing that is 3/16 wall thickness. The only other thing you have to do is to cut / sand off two opposing corners of the nut until it will slip into that same 2" tube.
    Then just weld the nut in place, screw in the bolt, and you have a heavy duty adjustable leg for any Bench or Jig or Table. Additionally you can drill through the side of the leg where the nut is and then tap the hole (1/4-20 would do nicely) insert a small round of brass and a quarter twenty bolt and be able to make sure the foot does not turn when you are dragging the bench or what ever, anywhere you want, or you could buy a few additional nuts and use them as locking nuts. The whole idea is to have a heavy duty adjustable foot for what ever you want and not have to pay through the nose for it. I mean 50 cents for each adjustable foot is pretty damned cheap for this sort of thing, and it will take literally tons of weight. I have included a few pictures of some of the uses I have put these rascals to. you will notice that the small stand next to the tube bender is partly on the metal pedestal and partly on the cement floor, with adjustable legs this is easy to still have a level surface, without them... not so much.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Inexpensive heavy dusty  adjustable feet for table jig or bench-p1030717.jpg   Inexpensive heavy dusty  adjustable feet for table jig or bench-p1030718.jpg   Inexpensive heavy dusty  adjustable feet for table jig or bench-p1030719.jpg   Inexpensive heavy dusty  adjustable feet for table jig or bench-p1030734.jpg   Inexpensive heavy dusty  adjustable feet for table jig or bench-p1030763.jpg  

    Inexpensive heavy dusty  adjustable feet for table jig or bench-p1030761.jpg   Inexpensive heavy dusty  adjustable feet for table jig or bench-p1030762.jpg  

  2. The Following 10 Users Say Thank You to hardtail69 For This Useful Post:

    Al8236 (08-15-2015), Aussie48 (03-01-2018), EnginePaul (07-13-2018), jere (08-14-2015), kbalch (08-17-2015), morsa (08-14-2015), Paul Jones (08-14-2015), PJs (08-17-2015), Tom Bradley (02-12-2018), Toolmaker51 (03-06-2018)

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    Content Editor DIYer's Avatar
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    Thanks for the tip on the sizes, hardtail69. No fussing about when I go to the hardware store.

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    hardtail69's Avatar
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    you are welcome DIYer. Its a simple thing but many simple things can lead to a great project. like this one. It is the finished and now working south bend screw cutting lathe that I have been working on. Every part was taken off, cleaned, repaired, (if necessary, and oooh was there a lot of necessary), or replaced, repainted, and reassembled. This was undoubtedly the most complex mechanical project I have ever undertaken. But as I said, it is now working and I have been making parts with it. I am still learning how to make stuff with it but I will tell you that having taken this thing down to bare metal and individual parts, I understand much more thoroughly how to use it than if I had bought a working unit to begin with. I highly recommend it to anyone.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Inexpensive heavy dusty  adjustable feet for table jig or bench-p1030750.jpg  

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    PJs (08-17-2015), Toolmaker51 (03-06-2018)

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    Content Editor Altair's Avatar
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    Nice work. May I suggest adding some rubber pads on those feet? For vibration damping and surface protection.

    Al

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    PJs (08-17-2015)

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    PJs
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    Great Idea Hardtail69! Love the simplicity of it and great to find the 2" tube is a natural fit for the nuts! That's a "Purdy" SB you have there too and absolutely agree about taking it all apart first!! Did that with my peanut and it made a world of difference for a newbie like me, to machining. Thanks for sharing.
    ‘‘Always do right. This will gratify some people and astonish the rest.’’
    Mark Twain

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    Thanks hardtail69! I've added your Adjustable Bench Feet to our Workbenches category, as well as to your builder page: hardtail69's Homemade Tools. Your receipt:


  10. #7
    crahar's Avatar
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    That's one idea I'm fixing to put to use in the not too distant future.
    Well done

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    hardtail69 (08-17-2015)

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    I had a metal table made for a fryer in a commercial kitchen. Instead of a bolt as hardtail69 did, the shop used a carriage bolt. The carriage bolt would slide, and not dig into the vinyl floor covering. Of course, the fryer oil acted as a good lube between the floor and the carriage bolt.

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    Too bloody obvious.
    I have been welding the nut in the corner of 50x5mm angle but thinner square RHS is a far better option for both strength and looks. To prevent sliding and provide a little damping I tack a large frost plug on the bolt head and fill it with a solid neoprene plug that sticks out about 5-10mm

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    Toolmaker51 (03-06-2018)

  15. #10

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    Excellent simple idea, will be using it this weekend for my Mini Lathe bench I am making, the imbecile who did my workshop floor (garage) mustn't have used a level as it slopes both across and down this will allow me to get the bench level, many thanks

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