Free 173 Best Homemade Tools eBook:  
Get 500+ tool plans, full site access, and more.

User Tag List

Results 1 to 5 of 5

Thread: 1969 GM liquid tire chain - photo and video

  1. #1
    Jon
    Jon is offline Jon has agreed the Seller's Terms of Service
    Administrator
    Supporting Member
    Jon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Colorado, USA
    Posts
    22,712
    Thanks
    7,049
    Thanked 33,872 Times in 9,506 Posts

    1969 GM liquid tire chain - photo and video

    1969 GM liquid tire chain.

    Fullsize image: https://s3-us-west-1.amazonaws.com/h...n_fullsize.jpg



    1969 Chevrolet Caprice commercial with the liquid tire chain option in action. 1:03 video:




    Previously:

    Clip-on tire spikes for winter driving - GIF
    Estonian ice road and resonance wave destruction - video and photo
    Formula One tire warmers - GIF and photo

    500 Tool Plans

  2. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to Jon For This Useful Post:

    Miloslav (Dec 21, 2019), Seedtick (Dec 21, 2019)

  3. #2
    Supporting Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2018
    Posts
    1,215
    Thanks
    4,879
    Thanked 615 Times in 330 Posts

    nova_robotics's Tools
    Interesting idea. I can't wrap my head around how it's supposed to work though. It's a spray polymer. Does it thicken up the snow and make it sticky? I don't get it.

    Homemade Tools eBooks

  4. #3
    Supporting Member Frank S's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2015
    Location
    Peacock TX
    Posts
    9,101
    Thanks
    1,304
    Thanked 7,229 Times in 3,475 Posts

    Frank S's Tools
    Quote Originally Posted by nova_robotics View Post
    Interesting idea. I can't wrap my head around how it's supposed to work though. It's a spray polymer. Does it thicken up the snow and make it sticky? I don't get it.
    It amounted to about the same thing as pouring bleach on your tires to gain just enough traction on ice to get moving.
    Another idea from the after market folks was to install nozzles in front of the tires and spray sand or a sand and salt mixture to create a traction media.
    Continental Trailways installed a device which had short lengths of chains on a disk that pneumatically lowered to near the bottom of the drive tires then make contact with the sidewalls the chains would spin and fling out by centrifugal force under the tires. Even some trucking fleets installed them but most soon learned that the spinning chains did not follow the clear path around their orbit and would destroy the air lines to the brake canisters. Or the driver would use them when they really weren't required the chains would wear out then the driver was left stuck or sliding on ice and snow because he didn't have standard chains to wrap on his tires.
    My bud carries his tire chains on his truck year round and has never needed them in snow but has used them frequently in spring and summer as mud chains
    Never try to tell me it can't be done
    When I have to paint I use KBS products

  5. #4
    Supporting Member basil3w's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Posts
    65
    Thanks
    30
    Thanked 29 Times in 22 Posts
    Back in the mid to late 60's I worked for an auto parts store north of Detroit. I remember we received a few cases of 'AC Delco Liquid Traction Improver' in September. My boss said that he had been to a trade show and this product would change winter driving as much as studded snow tires, but I just laughed and laughed. Fast forward to a really nasty October freezing rain storm. I walked out of the door after work and immediately fell on my butt. I went back inside and picked up a couple cans of the stuff, sprayed it on the soles of my shoes, let it dry, and walked right out to my car! The car was pointed uphill in the parking lot, so, loaded with confidence while the car was defrosting, I sprayed a bunch on the rear tires. It worked very well! The only problem was that you couldn't spray the bottom of the tire, resulting in a slight 'skip' in a small portion of each rotation. It worked very well on ice, but quickly lost effectiveness in wet or thawing roadways, it always got you moving, the question was, for how long? That year most of my relatives got a can of that stuff along with a note warning them to be careful if they used it on the soles of their boots - it really destroyed the car's foot pedals and carpet!

  6. #5
    Supporting Member Frank S's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2015
    Location
    Peacock TX
    Posts
    9,101
    Thanks
    1,304
    Thanked 7,229 Times in 3,475 Posts

    Frank S's Tools
    Quote Originally Posted by basil3w View Post
    Back in the mid to late 60's I worked for an auto parts store north of Detroit. I remember we received a few cases of 'AC Delco Liquid Traction Improver' in September. My boss said that he had been to a trade show and this product would change winter driving as much as studded snow tires, but I just laughed and laughed. Fast forward to a really nasty October freezing rain storm. I walked out of the door after work and immediately fell on my butt. I went back inside and picked up a couple cans of the stuff, sprayed it on the soles of my shoes, let it dry, and walked right out to my car! The car was pointed uphill in the parking lot, so, loaded with confidence while the car was defrosting, I sprayed a bunch on the rear tires. It worked very well! The only problem was that you couldn't spray the bottom of the tire, resulting in a slight 'skip' in a small portion of each rotation. It worked very well on ice, but quickly lost effectiveness in wet or thawing roadways, it always got you moving, the question was, for how long? That year most of my relatives got a can of that stuff along with a note warning them to be careful if they used it on the soles of their boots - it really destroyed the car's foot pedals and carpet!
    was this what you had? It looks like it may have been something like undercoating tar
    I was thinking it may have been like bleach that we used to pour over our tires to assist traction in racing, bleach also seemed to help some on ice
    1969 GM liquid tire chain - photo and video-004.jpg
    Edit just found what it was
    Liquid Tire Chain was invented/developed by the Dow Chemical Company and sold by them as an aftermarket aerosol spray can. It was a major event when Chevrolet agreed to add it as an accessory.

    Chemically it is a polymer (Styrene butadiene latex) dissolved in a solvent (primarily methanol). Instructions are to apply while rotating the tires (best if tires were a little warm from spinning or driving), let stand a few minutes (to evaporate the solvent and adhere the polymer) and then slowly drive away. Worked fairly well if conditions were right, best on ice. Was not as good as studded snow tires (which were introduced about the same time).
    http://www.2040-parts.com/liquid-tir...c400-i1135456/
    https://www.mcpolymers.com/library/s...utadiene-latex



    Tube Bender Build Guide
    Last edited by Frank S; Dec 22, 2019 at 12:14 AM.
    Never try to tell me it can't be done
    When I have to paint I use KBS products

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •