Free 173 Best Homemade Tools eBook:  
Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 1 2 3 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 29

Thread: 4ft hydraulic plate roll

  1. #11
    Frank S's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2015
    Location
    Peacock TX
    Posts
    4,389
    Thanks
    678
    Thanked 3,586 Times in 1,804 Posts

    Frank S's Tools
    Quote Originally Posted by metric_taper View Post
    I ordered the Rust Blast from the web address. Eddy Lucast must be your friend (I hope as your a great sales helper). We shall see how that treats the floor of the truck. I looked up the MSDS on this, looks like 2 active ingredients, Zinc phosphate and Phosphoric acid. I can not find a seller of the Zinc phosphate (in small quantities). It shows up in gopher and mole poison, so must be toxic and not sold over the counter.
    Thanks for the suggestions. I did watch their videos, they are selling a system, including the final coat of paint, which looks pretty good for exposed frames and suspension parts.
    I want to stop and fix the rust on the cab and fenders. But I don't want to go to far down that "rabbit hole" of removing every thing and exposing the frame. Mostly the frame is not in that bad of condition. I do want to fix all the leaks from old seals and bearings.
    I've known Eddy for probably 30 years but only met him for the first time about 6 years ago. He heard that I was making a trip to Ca. to pick up a lathe and some other equipment and called to ask if I had room to haul a small enclosed trailer back for him. Id then once I brought it to Texas I turned it into this for him
    http://www.homemadetools.net/forum/t...602#post102010
    His grandfather started Lucast Paints way back when then sold the company which is now Sherwin Williams.
    I built this plate roll because when We went to Ct. to Visit Eddy in May A friend of his had invented a lift that I am redesigning for him also had a need for some special made air tanks for a rare old 1927 Sterling chain drive truck. Hence the need to roll cylinders out of sheet metal and not finding any fab shop willing or with the correct size roll to do them for me I suppose I could have bought this one https://www.baileigh.com/plate-roll-pr-409 to make them but who has that amount of money laying around? At least I had the satisfaction of making it myself and was out only a hundred bucks or so in a few ot the things I didn't have laying around going to rust.
    It looks like bob is going to arrive with his truck long before I can finish my power unit if not I may slip the belt off add a handle to the pulley then manually roll the sheets that I need to get done I might even be able to get that done by late tonight
    Never try to tell me it can't be done
    When I have to paint I use http://kbs.justoldtrucks.com/

  2. The Following User Says Thank You to Frank S For This Useful Post:

    Gromet (08-13-2019)

  3. #12
    metric_taper's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2017
    Location
    Marion, Iowa
    Posts
    210
    Thanks
    69
    Thanked 94 Times in 58 Posts

    metric_taper's Tools
    I like the fold out display/sales shelves. The hinge had to be somewhat beefy to support all that product while going down the road. I understand there is a parked/stowed condition, so the cantilever load is not active during driving. Took some engineering to make this sturdy for the long term use.

    I've done something similar with 2x4 foot sheets of peg board, that are hinged so both sides of the 2x4 peg boards are used over the work bench. The peg board material is 1/8", and I assembled them into 2"x4" stud lumber wood frames. I used a saw kerf to hold the edges of the peg board in the stud lumber frame (there are two peg boards spaced an inch apart). I've not had problems with this thin of board. This was supposed to be a prototype, but it worked too good, even the 2x4s were weathered scrap. I've always wanted to add another layer with hinges that accommodate that movement in front of these. I just wish my organization was better, they seem to collect odd things over the work bench not used that often, outside of hammers, pliers, and screw drivers.

    Today's task is repair the horrible fright parts washer. The outlet pump tube just flops. I found they did a weld from a hose barb to the sheet metal box the pump is in, which was horrible in quality, and broke, This then stressed the pump, and it broke its plastic mount. So I fabbed an aluminum mount. And I was going to use a lock nut on the threaded end of the hose barb where an elbow is fitted that then connects the flexible tube that delivers the solvent. Pipe thread, right? Thread pitch is 1.25mm, and straight (not tapered) threads 12.8mm diameter. WTF is this? 1/4 male pipe fitting will start on it, but wrong thread pitch. So now I need to fab this as single point on the lathe. I don't want to weld it again, but that may be easier. I don't stock any metric pipe taps or dies in my tools.....yet.
    .
    So 12.8mm 1.25mm pitch, what is even close in this chart?;
    4ft hydraulic plate roll-metric-pipe-threads.jpg
    So it's some sort of Frankenstein bastard thread. And the chart is incomplete as the taper angle is not specified.
    It's looking like a weld will be done.
    Or I should just break down and buy a better parts washer. After this truck, then I have a 1924 model TT 1ton with a Ruckstell rear axle.
    Last edited by metric_taper; 08-12-2019 at 04:56 PM.

  4. The Following User Says Thank You to metric_taper For This Useful Post:

    Gromet (08-13-2019)

  5. #13
    Frank S's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2015
    Location
    Peacock TX
    Posts
    4,389
    Thanks
    678
    Thanked 3,586 Times in 1,804 Posts

    Frank S's Tools
    Quote Originally Posted by metric_taper View Post
    I like the fold out display/sales shelves. The hinge had to be somewhat beefy to support all that product while going down the road. I understand there is a parked/stowed condition, so the cantilever load is not active during driving. Took some engineering to make this sturdy for the long term use.

    I've done something similar with 2x4 foot sheets of peg board, that are hinged so both sides of the 2x4 peg boards are used over the work bench. The peg board material is 1/8", and I assembled them into 2"x4" stud lumber wood frames. I used a saw kerf to hold the edges of the peg board in the stud lumber frame (there are two peg boards spaced an inch apart). I've not had problems with this thin of board. This was supposed to be a prototype, but it worked too good, even the 2x4s were weathered scrap. I've always wanted to add another layer with hinges that accommodate that movement in front of these. I just wish my organization was better, they seem to collect odd things over the work bench not used that often, outside of hammers, pliers, and screw drivers.

    Today's task is repair the horrible fright parts washer. The outlet pump tube just flops. I found they did a weld from a hose barb to the sheet metal box the pump is in, which was horrible in quality, and broke, This then stressed the pump, and it broke its plastic mount. So I fabbed an aluminum mount. And I was going to use a lock nut on the threaded end of the hose barb where an elbow is fitted that then connects the flexible tube that delivers the solvent. Pipe thread, right? Thread pitch is 1.25mm, and straight (not tapered) threads 12.8mm diameter. WTF is this? 1/4 male pipe fitting will start on it, but wrong thread pitch. So now I need to fab this as single point on the lathe. I don't want to weld it again, but that may be easier. I don't stock any metric pipe taps or dies in my tools.....yet.
    .
    So 12.8mm 1.25mm pitch, what is even close in this chart?;
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Metric pipe threads.jpg 
Views:	13 
Size:	149.2 KB 
ID:	30695
    So it's some sort of Frankenstein bastard thread. And the chart is incomplete as the taper angle is not specified.
    It's looking like a weld will be done.
    Or I should just break down and buy a better parts washer. After this truck, then I have a 1924 model TT 1ton with a Ruckstell rear axle.
    From your description of the thread this sounds more like an SAE-5 fitting size. is there a 45 beveled land at the face of the hole? If so then the fitting would also require an O ring for the seal. Do you have a 1/2" fine thread bolt laying around? If so see if it will screw into the hole
    1.25 mm pitch equals 20.32 TPI pretty easy to confuse a metric thread with UNF at that size.
    Never try to tell me it can't be done
    When I have to paint I use http://kbs.justoldtrucks.com/

  6. #14
    metric_taper's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2017
    Location
    Marion, Iowa
    Posts
    210
    Thanks
    69
    Thanked 94 Times in 58 Posts

    metric_taper's Tools
    Quote Originally Posted by Frank S View Post
    From your description of the thread this sounds more like an SAE-5 fitting size. is there a 45 beveled land at the face of the hole? If so then the fitting would also require an O ring for the seal. Do you have a 1/2" fine thread bolt laying around? If so see if it will screw into the hole
    1.25 mm pitch equals 20.32 TPI pretty easy to confuse a metric thread with UNF at that size.
    It is China made junk from 30 years ago when their quality was half of what it is now. I'm sure this is all bastard thread, at least to the world, but maybe an old standard that China had.
    There is an elbow that threads onto the hose barb fitting. No there is no bevel for an Oring.
    The elbow did tighten up as if the fitting were tapered.
    They used hose clamps that were for much larger hose diameter, so they just clipped the excess band length off. The problem is it was made from too thick of material for the 5/8" ID hose, and it would not tighten down to that small of a diameter, so one of the clamps was stripped. Clearly someone made decisions to produce them this way.
    A short piece of hose connected the pump outlet to the hose barb fitting. The weld failure of the hose barb to the case of the pump, then caused the pump mount fitting and its failure. I did re-weld it in place, this time instead of a tack, I got 180 degree around the fitting. Other then touching the filler rod to the electrode a few times , the weld looks pretty good. I like TIG as you can go back over your weld and make it look better, but my welds don't look as good as they used too. I had forgotten that I have special prescription lens for just welding, once I put them on, everything was in focus. I like welding about 18" from my eyes, so I had the optician set me up for that distance of focal length. My tri-focals are set up for distance, computer (out stretched arm length) and reading (too close for welding). I just have to remember to put them on.
    So one of the goals was to get the pump to sit on the bottom of the tank. The pump is in a box, with an solvent filter. Many years ago, I fixed a problem where the hole the electric box came in on the side of the tank, had a large rectangular hole that let solvent evaporate. So I cut out a piece of aluminum larger then the hole and marked the mounting holes and electric feed through to the pump. This fixed the evaporation problem, but raised the pump about an inch off the bottom. I had to always put in more then 5 gallons of solvent to keep it pumping.
    HF is still selling this same parts cleaner, I'll have to see if they fixed this original design defect. Seems I'm always fixing those.

    Sorry I've totally screwed your post up.

    Do you have photos of your 1927 Sterling chain drive truck? I've never heard of this manufacture.
    What were the air tanks used for, or was this a service truck with compressed air?

  7. #15
    metric_taper's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2017
    Location
    Marion, Iowa
    Posts
    210
    Thanks
    69
    Thanked 94 Times in 58 Posts

    metric_taper's Tools
    I see there is a wiki article on Sterling trucks, they went out of biz in 2009. Looks like they kept chain drive for a very long time.
    Seems they must be very rare, and I bet WWII scrap drive removed many from existence.

  8. #16
    Frank S's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2015
    Location
    Peacock TX
    Posts
    4,389
    Thanks
    678
    Thanked 3,586 Times in 1,804 Posts

    Frank S's Tools
    I don't know if the pics showed it very well or not but addition to the top shelves folding out the center shelf unit not only raises and lowers but is on a 4 link parallel set up and is raised by an electric winch puling 2 cables to lift from the ends the shelf moves forward into the window cavity as it raises . When everything is parked for transport the product is held in place by a slip in panel between the wing shelves and the lowered center shelf. I designed it to have 2 more fold out thinner fold out doors attached to the wing shelves which would have held a pair of 48" flat screen TV's but he never bought the TV's so I never added the 2 extra wings. All of the shelves when parked take up less than half of the trailer so the opposite side is used as bulk storage Some of the larger car shows he sets up at he will average 10k in sales per weekend. He is very knowledgeable about application methods and trouble shooting someone's coating problems for rust prevention.
    Never try to tell me it can't be done
    When I have to paint I use http://kbs.justoldtrucks.com/

  9. #17
    Frank S's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2015
    Location
    Peacock TX
    Posts
    4,389
    Thanks
    678
    Thanked 3,586 Times in 1,804 Posts

    Frank S's Tools
    Hey it's my thread and if it strays from the build so be it. Others may not agree but all information is useful when you find it.
    the air tanks are for the air brake system Sterling had air brakes when many other manufactures were still running vacuum hydraulics But the truck in question could be a 37 not 27 he has maybe 20 of them in various states of disrepair some are so old they have wooden frames and some have a composite of wood and steel.
    these are the only pictures of it since the cab had been sent to Canada to be dipped.
    He built a rotisserie to work on the frame
    4ft hydraulic plate roll-20190501_151738xz.jpg
    4ft hydraulic plate roll-20190501_151730xz.jpg
    Last edited by Frank S; 08-12-2019 at 08:48 PM.
    Never try to tell me it can't be done
    When I have to paint I use http://kbs.justoldtrucks.com/

  10. The Following User Says Thank You to Frank S For This Useful Post:

    KustomsbyKent (08-12-2019)

  11. #18
    metric_taper's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2017
    Location
    Marion, Iowa
    Posts
    210
    Thanks
    69
    Thanked 94 Times in 58 Posts

    metric_taper's Tools
    Quote Originally Posted by Frank S View Post
    Hey it's my thread and if it strays from the build so be it. Others may not agree but all information is useful when you find it.
    the air tanks are for the air brake system Sterling had air brakes when many other manufactures were still running vacuum hydraulics But the truck in question could be a 37 not 27 he has maybe 20 of them in various states of disrepair some are so old they have wooden frames and some have a composite of wood and steel.
    these are the only pictures of it since the cab had been sent to Canada to be dipped.
    He built a rotisserie to work on the frame
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	20190501_151738xz.jpg 
Views:	19 
Size:	235.8 KB 
ID:	30696
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	20190501_151730xz.jpg 
Views:	16 
Size:	229.3 KB 
ID:	30697
    That is one heck of a project, and to build a rotisserie to work the machine. And to collect a family of their truck designs.
    And then you, building a custom sheet roller to make a very specific part. They had to have clever people to design air brakes and such. Making controllable flow valves and producing them took some ingenuity.

  12. #19
    metric_taper's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2017
    Location
    Marion, Iowa
    Posts
    210
    Thanks
    69
    Thanked 94 Times in 58 Posts

    metric_taper's Tools
    Frank, the Rust Blast arrived, that was fast.
    So I can't flood rinse the truck floor, is putting baking soda on after a sponge wash OK to neutralize the acid? I'm going to try spray application with plastic sheet to keep from drying. The instructions say DO NOT allow surface to dry, with that emphasis. I assume oxygen gets back in, and surface rust occurs.
    Sorry for asking you this, as the web site does not have any way to contact them via email or online support.
    Thanks.
    I went to their main site and did a live chat and have all the answers.
    Last edited by metric_taper; 08-13-2019 at 10:27 AM.

  13. #20
    Frank S's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2015
    Location
    Peacock TX
    Posts
    4,389
    Thanks
    678
    Thanked 3,586 Times in 1,804 Posts

    Frank S's Tools
    Quote Originally Posted by metric_taper View Post
    Frank, the Rust Blast arrived, that was fast.
    So I can't flood rinse the truck floor, is putting baking soda on after a sponge wash OK to neutralize the acid? I'm going to try spray application with plastic sheet to keep from drying. The instructions say DO NOT allow surface to dry, with that emphasis. I assume oxygen gets back in, and surface rust occurs.
    Sorry for asking you this, as the web site does not have any way to contact them via email or online support.
    Thanks.
    I went to their main site and did a live chat and have all the answers.
    No need to neutralize the reason for keeping the surface/s being treated wet for a time is to aid the process in devouring the rust,
    Here's one good way first if you have heavy rusted surface that has large built up amounts of layered rust If at all possible chip or brush off any chucks of rust that you can wire brush the area to remove more loose rust. I have a pneumatic needle scaler that does a great job just like removing flux from welds. Also have cup brushes for angle grinders that I sometimes will don a respirator goggles and a full face mask to lightly go over the entire area. But not always sometimes I will simply wash large sheet metal areas with water to remove as much loose dust and any rust that will readily wash away. then blow dry to evaporate the excess water I don't worry about getting the parts completely dry.
    I am almost positive a small 1qt hand sprayer was included in your order I know it did if it was sent by Eddy from his warehouse stock but there have been times when products have been drop shipped from the factory that these sprayers have been left out. If you did not receive one you can locate his phone number on his site or PM me with your info such as phone number and email and within 24 hrs I will see that he gets your information he will call you within an hour after I call him usually while I'm still on the phone with him.
    Ok, fill the sprayer adjust the nozzle to a fine mist spray the surface until it looks wet ( when I am spraying say a floor pan by the time I get it covered I will start at the beginning again and do this until the whole surface remains glistening with moisture then what I do to save time and product is I cover the area when ever possible with plastic film the stuff you use to wrap sandwiches in or the 18 to 24 inch wide shrink wrap film you don't have to stretch it tight just lay the film over the areas then check back in an hour or so if it still looks wet forget about it for a while Depending on how badly the area is corroded will depend on how many applications you want to use once it gets to bare metal there will be no further reactions. Disclaimer if doing this on aluminum surfaces certain alloys of aluminum will continue to etch even after all corrosion is gone if you keep renewing the process but if allowed to dry any further eching stops.
    I have sprayed badly corroded lamp sockets like the old 1157 stop/ taillights that were so bad it was impossible to remove the bulbs and if the bulbs were good after a couple sometimes a few hours of treatment the light would begin working when power was applied to them sometimes without ever removing the bulb.
    I have tossed nuts and bolts in a plastic or glass container of the stuff left them over night the next day the color will have all been faded to a dirty clear simply pour out the bolts spread them on a cloth then re use them.
    For rusted on stuck nuts and bolts I have tried little experiments like holding a plastic tube over them filling it with the product then taped the tube in place of have pre glued them in place left the product over night to do its work then the next day unscrewed the bolts sometimes helping them along with a little lubricant.
    Hope this gives you some useful info.
    Never try to tell me it can't be done
    When I have to paint I use http://kbs.justoldtrucks.com/

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •