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Thread: Car window rescue tools - GIF

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    When I did extrication we used a windscreen saw (with shaving cream as dust control) for windscreens, and the Phillips screwdriver from a leatherman for side windows. The windscreen saw had a glass breaker in it, but most of us carried leathermans, so it was easy to whip that out and bust a side glass if needed.

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    Quote Originally Posted by desbromilow View Post
    When I did extrication we used a windscreen saw (with shaving cream as dust control) for windscreens, and the Phillips screwdriver from a leatherman for side windows. The windscreen saw had a glass breaker in it, but most of us carried leathermans, so it was easy to whip that out and bust a side glass if needed.
    what was the technique you used with the leatherman?

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    open the leatherman so the #2 phillips bit was out/ accessible, hold the leatherman in a closed fist with the point of the driver towards the bottom of your hand, rest your elbow further down the door (on the panel) so your hand would strike the bottom of the window - about 3" (75mm) above the lower window seal. Simply "stab" the window with the point of the driver and it shatters. - All of the rest (placement of elbow on panel) is so the follow through can't allow your hand to enter the cab - and therefore go trough the falling glass. When I first did it, it'd take 2 blows because I'd keep flinching and "pulling my punch"... once I gained more experience in rescue I didn't hold back and would generally go through on first strike. - The serrated blade in a leatherman Charge is useful for cutting seatbelts - the "gut hook" on the back is a great safe blade for cutting belts (always cut at an angle)

    Des

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    Quote Originally Posted by desbromilow View Post
    open the leatherman so the #2 phillips bit was out/ accessible, hold the leatherman in a closed fist with the point of the driver towards the bottom of your hand, rest your elbow further down the door (on the panel) so your hand would strike the bottom of the window - about 3" (75mm) above the lower window seal. Simply "stab" the window with the point of the driver and it shatters. - All of the rest (placement of elbow on panel) is so the follow through can't allow your hand to enter the cab - and therefore go trough the falling glass. When I first did it, it'd take 2 blows because I'd keep flinching and "pulling my punch"... once I gained more experience in rescue I didn't hold back and would generally go through on first strike. - The serrated blade in a leatherman Charge is useful for cutting seatbelts - the "gut hook" on the back is a great safe blade for cutting belts (always cut at an angle)

    Des
    Thanks.....the *cut at an angle* is another helpful tip.

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    Quote Originally Posted by desbromilow View Post
    When I did extrication we used a windscreen saw (with shaving cream as dust control) for windscreens, and the Phillips screwdriver from a leatherman for side windows.
    Shaving cream can be used as a machining coolant and lubricant in a pinch. I wonder if that's how Anchor lube got their idea.

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    Quote Originally Posted by FEM2008 View Post
    Shaving cream can be used as a machining coolant and lubricant in a pinch. I wonder if that's how Anchor lube got their idea.
    Barbasol Mint makes the shop smell nice too.



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