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Thread: Unimat faceplate

  1. #1
    Supporting Member threesixesinarow's Avatar
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    threesixesinarow's Tools

    Unimat faceplate

    Here is a faceplate I made from scrap steel a few years ago.

    It’s about 3” diameter and is threaded M12-1.0 so it can screw onto either the headstock or tailstock of an old Unimat, or anything else with the same thread.

    The clamps hold relatively thin work off the faceplate surface. They’re a little fiddly to use.

    Unimat faceplate-7691af19-c74f-4b5b-ae47-59382ec5bc4f.jpgUnimat faceplate-7595cd70-eaa4-423b-9f2e-56f00eedab3a.jpg

    Unimat faceplate-unimatfaceplate1.jpgUnimat faceplate-unimatfaceplate2.jpg
    45 Best Harbor Freight Tool Modifications


  2. The Following 6 Users Say Thank You to threesixesinarow For This Useful Post:

    Jon (05-07-2018), Paul Jones (05-09-2018), PJs (05-08-2018), rossbotics (05-09-2018), Seedtick (05-07-2018), Toolmaker51 (05-07-2018)

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    Supporting Member Toolmaker51's Avatar
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    Toolmaker51's Tools
    500+ Homemade Tool Plans

    Quote Originally Posted by threesixesinarow View Post
    Here is a faceplate I made from scrap steel a few years ago.

    It’s about 3” diameter and is threaded M12-1.0 so it can screw onto either the headstock or tailstock of an old Unimat, or anything else with the same thread.

    The clamps hold relatively thin work off the faceplate surface. They’re a little fiddly to use.
    A little fiddly is not so bad, if they are secure. Small machines x small parts = higher RPMS.
    And plenty stuff in orbit already...
    Forge Build Guide

    Sincerely,
    Toolmaker51
    ...we'll learn more by wandering than searching...

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    Paul Jones (05-09-2018)

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    Supporting Member rossbotics's Avatar
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    rossbotics's Tools
    Lokks nice, very well executed

    Doug
    Comments are always welcome
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  6. #4
    Supporting Member threesixesinarow's Avatar
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    threesixesinarow's Tools
    Quote Originally Posted by Toolmaker51 View Post
    A little fiddly is not so bad, if they are secure. Small machines x small parts = higher RPMS.
    And plenty stuff in orbit already...
    You’re right, and those unused slots could be used for more clamps for extra holding power, or screw dogs for finer fiddling.


    A traditional one would probably be run at more reasonable speeds than my Unimat:

    https://books.google.com/books?id=HE...page&q&f=false

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    Paul Jones (05-09-2018)

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    Supporting Member threesixesinarow's Avatar
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    threesixesinarow's Tools
    Thanks, Doug.

    - Clark

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    Thanks threesixesinarow! We've added your Unimat Faceplate to our Lathe Accessories category,
    as well as to your builder page: threesixesinarow's Homemade Tools. Your receipt:




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    Supporting Member Paul Jones's Avatar
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    Paul Jones's Tools
    threesixesinarow,

    That is a useful faceplate. I like you lathe adaptation using an old Unimat spindle. What is the distance between lathe centers?

    I also like the small milling machine you made (see the thread http://www.homemadetools.net/forum/h...0-2#post109791 ).

    Regards,

    Paul

  11. #8
    Supporting Member threesixesinarow's Avatar
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    threesixesinarow's Tools
    Quote Originally Posted by Paul Jones View Post
    That is a useful faceplate. I like you lathe adaptation using an old Unimat spindle. What is the distance between lathe centers?
    Thanks, Paul - Your faceplate looks more versatile!

    I think that lathe can fit five or six inches depending on what centers so maybe a bit less than the Unimat.

    Unimat faceplate-m12deadcenter.jpg

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    Paul Jones (05-10-2018)

  13. #9
    Supporting Member Paul Jones's Avatar
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    Paul Jones's Tools
    threesiixesinarow,

    Thanks for faceplate comment. Unfortunately, my faceplate is also a little fiddly to use. For many of my setups, it is easier to start with the faceplate sitting horizontally on the workbench, lightly snug the clamps down and then mount the faceplate back on the lathe and then make the final small adjustments using a soft-faced or brass hammer to tap into final position.

    The 3" swing Unimat lathe has the homemade faceplate weighing only a few ounces and so it is much easier to do the removing the faceplate to the workbench and then remounting the faceplate on the lathe. My heavier cam-lock faceplate for my my 12" swing lathe is harder to do with this technique but it works on the bigger lathe.

    Regards,

    Paul
    Last edited by Paul Jones; 05-11-2018 at 09:12 AM. Reason: more clarity for the method

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    Supporting Member threesixesinarow's Avatar
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    threesixesinarow's Tools
    Loading it horizontally is a much better strategy than what I’ve been doing and the slots and off center clamps only make it worse.

    Coil springs around the main screw between the top and bottom part my clamps would help a lot but I don’t think I left enough room. They’re so light maybe hot melt glue or putty would hold them long enough to get the work in place.

    Thanks for the tip!

    - Clark

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    Paul Jones (05-11-2018)

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