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Thread: Vintage work crew photos

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    pop corn tubes for in flight movie goers

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    Supporting Member Frank S's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mklotz View Post
    Surprisingly, this compilation...

    https://bluejacket.com/usn_avi_lta.html

    indicates that the the earliest classes of Navy dirigibles (A, B, C) were filled with hydrogen. It wasn't until C-7 that helium was used.

    I suspect the smaller of the two tubes was used to spill the water ballast so the ship could rise. The other tube might be a gas vent for descending. Maybe that tube is a fill tube. In either case, why the strange angle?
    According to the article provided by Denis G the tube being at the angle positioned near the prop was to force air into the ballonets the small tube would have been for venting said air.
    Kind of an interesting way of controlling altitude plus ascending and descending. Also it would be a delicate balance between slightly compressing the helium by reducing its free volume with the air in the ballonets the air would also become denser under a slightly higher pressure making it negatively buoyant
    Never try to tell me it can't be done
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    Supporting Member Hoosiersmoker's Avatar
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    I wonder if it has to do with being directly behind the prop?

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    Ralph, I can see 2 wires on the upper leading edge of the angled tube, and on the "circumferential band" just back from the opening I can see wires running down to the stays running aft from the cockpit, plus there looks to be others also running from that band up to the hydrogen envelope.

    Cheers Phil

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    Denis G's Tools
    Quote Originally Posted by Frank S View Post
    According to the article provided by Denis G the tube being at the angle positioned near the prop was to force air into the ballonets the small tube would have been for venting said air.
    Kind of an interesting way of controlling altitude plus ascending and descending. Also it would be a delicate balance between slightly compressing the helium by reducing its free volume with the air in the ballonets the air would also become denser under a slightly higher pressure making it negatively buoyant
    Here's an "unclassified" manual for flying a K-Type airship if you ever find yourself in the pilot's seat:
    https://www.faa.gov/regulations_poli...lot_manual.pdf
    Page 22 describes the "Envelope Pressure Control System" and the functions of the fore and aft ballonets.

    The previous section contains a detailed tally of the weight of the components in the airship including the machine gun and ammo.
    (I don't think that I'd like the job manning the machine gun.)

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    You think the guy in the aft that cranks over the engine gets to man a machine gun...

  8. #1077
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    Ship fitters, Mare Island Naval Shipyard, California, circa 1943.
    Fullsize image: https://s3-us-west-1.amazonaws.com/h...s_fullsize.jpg


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    Frank S's Tools
    Quote Originally Posted by Denis G View Post
    Here's an "unclassified" manual for flying a K-Type airship if you ever find yourself in the pilot's seat:
    https://www.faa.gov/regulations_poli...lot_manual.pdf
    Page 22 describes the "Envelope Pressure Control System" and the functions of the fore and aft ballonets.

    The previous section contains a detailed tally of the weight of the components in the airship including the machine gun and ammo.
    (I don't think that I'd like the job manning the machine gun.)
    Thanks Denis G now after reading the manual I feel certain that I am officially fully unqualified to pilot a US Navy air ship. But hopefully I would know enough of the basics not to get tossed out a port hole.
    While reading that it reminded me of an Indiana Jones movie
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    Supporting Member Frank S's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jon View Post
    The lady in the center has the perfect tool for the job of freeing a sticky valve stem just tap on it a few times.
    If it hadn't been for the women during the wars there is no way the allied forces could have defeated the foes.
    Never try to tell me it can't be done
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    "Ship fitters, Mare Island Naval Shipyard, California, circa 1943. "

    I was a child but I remember everyone having an attitude of working together for the common good.
    Jim

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