Free 173 Best Homemade Tools eBook:  
Remove advertisements
Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 15

Thread: Adjustable height table legs

  1. #1

    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    TriCities, WA.
    Posts
    60
    Thanks
    9
    Thanked 62 Times in 24 Posts

    EclecticNeophyte's Tools

    Adjustable height table legs

    Adjustable height table legs-20141009_131530.jpg Adjustable height table legs-20141009_131539.jpg Adjustable height table legs-20141009_131810.jpg

    I had an epiphany one day, and this was the result. Adjustable height table legs... Made (mostly) from perforated galvanized steel tube (there's another name for this stuff, but I honestly can't recall what it is at the moment...sorry). I purchased the tube from a local sign and barricade (road sign supplier) outlet.

    The tubes are 2" x 2" with a telescoping section in the center that is 1 3/4" x 1 3/4" square tube. Both are available from the same source. I attached the telescoping legs to the table top with 1/4" x 5" x 5" steel plate welded to a 3" long section of 2" square tube (1/4" wall thickness). The rest is just a bunch of holes with bolts, nuts, washers, etc.. The sign post tubing is perforated with 7/16" dia holes every inch along it's length, giving 1 inch adjust-ability... The leg sections are 26" long, giving a range up to about 50" once fully extended. The table shown in the photos was set to approximately 44" from floor to top. This makes for a standing height desk or work bench for anyone 6 ft tall. But as I said, the table can be adjusted up or down as needed. Once assembled, it was found to be quite robust and stable.

    -EN
    Last edited by EclecticNeophyte; 10-11-2014 at 12:36 AM.

  2. The Following 6 Users Say Thank You to EclecticNeophyte For This Useful Post:

    almarghi (08-07-2018), billster (04-15-2018), jjr2001 (04-16-2018), kbalch (10-10-2014), labhras773 (11-23-2016), Tom Bradley (02-12-2018)

  3. #2
    Content Editor DIYer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Posts
    3,087
    Thanks
    337
    Thanked 655 Times in 595 Posts
    Thanks for the idea. I've been looking around for ideas for an adjustable height laptop table.

  4. #3

    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    TriCities, WA.
    Posts
    60
    Thanks
    9
    Thanked 62 Times in 24 Posts

    EclecticNeophyte's Tools
    Thanks DIYer. I'm not certain what analog to the steel tubes exist in aluminum, but if such a thing does, it would make for a much lighter weight setup. Laptops weigh next to nothing, so aluminum legs would have more than plenty of strength. It would also be a bit easier to machine...

    -EN

  5. #4

    Join Date
    Oct 2014
    Location
    Salt Lake City
    Posts
    3
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Hey, How much cost of this setup? I think It will take so much time to adjust b/w sit & stand positon during work. what you think? I think you have to made some changes to adjust easily up - down position.

  6. #5

    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    TriCities, WA.
    Posts
    60
    Thanks
    9
    Thanked 62 Times in 24 Posts

    EclecticNeophyte's Tools
    Quote Originally Posted by trevorchristiansen View Post
    Hey, How much cost of this setup? I think It will take so much time to adjust b/w sit & stand positon during work. what you think? I think you have to made some changes to adjust easily up - down position.
    Hi Trevor,

    Cost likely depends greatly on prices from local sources (i.e., in your area) for the materials. I didn't total things up for these, as it was a company expense, and a one time 'sunk cost' purchase.

    In our case, we have staff using them to hold up desks, and the traditional sort of legs were 4" x 4" timbers. Because we must follow ergonomic rules for proper working height, each desk potentially ends up a different height.

    Some staff also want/need to work from a standing position, others sitting down. Since we have limited storage space, we can't stack up numerous wooden legs for each height table. That means we're looking at purchasing new timbers (at approx $30 per table), then cutting to size, etc... Any waste or excess wood had to be tossed (no storage, remember?) which is very wasteful. Changing to different length legs, is also an issue as well; as it means removing a bunch of screws, sheet metal brackets, etc...(very time consuming!).

    So while the bolts and nuts, washers, aren't the most convenient; given our old way of doing things, they aren't the least either. I also think they help make the legs more rigid, which helps with stability.

    -EN
    Last edited by EclecticNeophyte; 10-18-2014 at 04:02 PM.

  7. #6
    Content Editor DIYer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Posts
    3,087
    Thanks
    337
    Thanked 655 Times in 595 Posts
    Thanks for the suggestion, EN! Not being one to build something for a singular purpose, I still may use steel just to make it a multipurpose table.

  8. #7

    Join Date
    Oct 2014
    Location
    Salt Lake City
    Posts
    3
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by EclecticNeophyte View Post
    Hi Trevor,

    Cost likely depends greatly on prices from local sources (i.e., in your area) for the materials. I didn't total things up for these, as it was a company expense, and a one time 'sunk cost' purchase.

    In our case, we have staff using them to hold up desks, and the traditional sort of legs were 4" x 4" timbers. Because we must follow ergonomic rules for proper working height, each desk potentially ends up a different height.

    Some staff also want/need to work from a standing position, others sitting down. Since we have limited storage space, we can't stack up numerous wooden legs for each height table. That means we're looking at purchasing new timbers (at approx $30 per table), then cutting to size, etc... Any waste or excess wood had to be tossed (no storage, remember?) which is very wasteful. Changing to different length legs, is also an issue as well; as it means removing a bunch of screws, sheet metal brackets, etc...(very time consuming!).

    So while the bolts and nuts, washers, aren't the most convenient; given our old way of doing things, they aren't the least either. I also think they help make the legs more rigid, which helps with stability.

    -EN
    Hi EclecticNeophyte, Is it possible to make it automatically switch between sit & stand position by just push a button?

  9. #8
    Administrator
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    Clermont, FL
    Posts
    5,034
    Thanks
    2,275
    Thanked 499 Times in 371 Posts
    This thread has been moved to the Must Read subforum. Congrats (and thanks) to EclecticNeophyte for making such a valuable contribution!

  10. #9
    Content Editor DIYer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Posts
    3,087
    Thanks
    337
    Thanked 655 Times in 595 Posts
    Thanks EclecticNeophyte! We've added your Adjustable Table Legs to our Miscellaneous category, as well as to your builder page: EclecticNeophyte's Homemade Tools. Your receipt:


  11. #10

    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Posts
    2
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by EclecticNeophyte View Post
    Hi Trevor,

    Cost likely depends greatly on prices from local sources (i.e., in your area) for the materials. I didn't total things up for these, as it was a company expense, and a one time 'sunk cost' purchase.

    In our case, we have staff using them to hold up desks, and the traditional sort of legs were 4" x 4" timbers. Because we must follow ergonomic rules for proper working height, each desk potentially ends up a different height.

    Some staff also want/need to work from a standing position, others sitting down. Since we have limited storage space, we can't stack up numerous wooden legs for each height table. That means we're looking at purchasing new timbers (at approx $30 per table), then cutting to size, etc... Any waste or excess wood had to be tossed (no storage, remember?) which is very wasteful. Changing to different length legs, is also an issue as well; as it means removing a bunch of screws, sheet metal brackets, etc...(very time consuming!).

    So while the bolts and nuts, washers, aren't the most convenient; given our old way of doing things, they aren't the least either. I also think they help make the legs more rigid, which helps with stability.

    -EN
    . Great idea, If you want to make it easier to adjust, Google "pip" pin, or "sword" pin. One has spring loaded balls, like the retaining balls on a socket set ratchet or extension bar, when inserted into the hole the balls prevent the pin from coming out, you pull the ring on the end to release. The sword type has a blade pivoting at one end which turns 90 degrees after insertion and needs straightening to remove. Or you could just cross drill some round bar that fits and use "R" clips to secure,(much cheaper).
    Hope this may be of use.
    Doug.

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •