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Thread: Angle checking tools

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    Supporting Member mklotz's Avatar
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    mklotz's Tools

    Angle checking tools

    Two types of tools for checking common angles. The block on the top in the photo has its corners cut to common angles found on various types of chisels and plane blades. Plates screewed to the block create angled 'pockets' into which an edge is pushed to check the angle when grinding or inspecting. Made from aluminum, the gage can't knick or dull the blades being tested.


    The small tools below the block are nothing more than chunks of 1/4" key stock with the ends formed to commonly encountered angles, eg 15, 30, 45, 60 degrees. It's amazing how often these come in handy, especially "sanity checks" on complicated setups. Their real advantage is their small size and consequent ability to get into places that normal angle gages simply won't fit.
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    Last edited by mklotz; 07-07-2017 at 03:04 PM.
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    Regards, Marv


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  2. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to mklotz For This Useful Post:

    EclecticNeophyte (05-04-2017), kbalch (09-08-2015)

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    Thanks Marv! I've added your Angle Checking Tools to our Angle Guides and Try Squares category, as well as to your builder page: mklotz's Homemade Tools. Your receipt:

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    That's a great tool! Fast, cheap and easy to replicate. Thanks for the idea.

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    Supporting Member mklotz's Avatar
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    mklotz's Tools
    Quote Originally Posted by DIYer View Post
    That's a great tool! Fast, cheap and easy to replicate. Thanks for the idea.
    If you sharpen your own drills there's a simple drill point gage that's easy to make. Use a new, factory-ground drill to drill part way into an aluminum rod. On the milling machine cut away half the rod longitudinally thus exposing the cavity made by the drill. Use this to check the (typically 118 degree) tip angle when grinding your own. It's an especially handy technique if grinding angles (eg 135 degrees) other than those available on commercial drill gages.
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    Supporting Member Toolmaker51's Avatar
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    Toolmaker51's Tools
    Quote Originally Posted by mklotz View Post
    Two types of tools for checking common angles. The block on the top in the photo has its corners cut to common angles found on various types of chisels and plane blades. Plates screewed to the block create angled 'pockets' into which an edge is pushed to check the angle when grinding or inspecting. Made from aluminum, the gage can't knick or dull the blades being tested.


    The small tools below the block are nothing more than chunks of 1/4" key stock with the ends formed to commonly encountered angles, eg 15, 30, 45, 60 degrees. It's amazing how often these come in handy, especially "sanity checks" on complicated setups. Their real advantage is their small size and consequent ability to get into places that normal angle gages simply won't fit.
    We used to joke whoever made commercial angle gauges must never had used them. almost always tooooo big. Later some came to market, very compact, thin and satin chrome; with complimentary and included-angles as well.
    Dandy, just dandy.
    Length too short, then because the notches can't always find a reference plane, and best of all not very high at a half inch or so. More tricks than a monkey in a mile of grapevine, but they sit in the drawer for lack of love.
    Marv's solution is just ideal. Take note old commercial entities - THIS is toolmaking and how she is done. I really like the bladed 'keys'. Think I'll order some W-1.


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