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Thread: Crane collapses due to bad rigging - GIF

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    Quote Originally Posted by WorkerB View Post
    Cos the videographer believes in self preservation.
    You are correct in this case but I have watched a lot of other videos with this problem.

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    Supporting Member Hoosiersmoker's Avatar
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    Looks like the guy stading on the load when it let go might have gotten pinned against the other side of the truck. No safety coordinator worth a cuss around that day!

  3. #13
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    he may be a Red Neck

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    Supporting Member IntheGroove's Avatar
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    IntheGroove's Tools
    Here's your sign...

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    Supporting Member Toolmaker51's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hoosiersmoker View Post
    Looks like the guy stading on the load when it let go might have gotten pinned against the other side of the truck. No safety coordinator worth a cuss around that day!
    Personally, I see that as the problem; reliance on someone to monitor one's actions.
    As Mike Rowe [Dirty Jobs, The Way I Heard It, Returning The Favor, TED.com...] puts it, the superior perspective is Safety Third, with personal responsibility as number 1.
    Expecting an observer to know more/ care more about you [and those around] than individuals, is merely a dodge by insurers, redirecting culpability to an intermediate party, and forms niche of personal injury attorneys.
    With another tip of the hat to their lobbyists...
    Sincerely,
    Toolmaker51
    ...we'll learn more by wandering than searching...

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    Tonyg (07-14-2020)

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    Supporting Member NeiljohnUK's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Toolmaker51 View Post
    Personally, I see that as the problem; reliance on someone to monitor one's actions.
    As Mike Rowe [Dirty Jobs, The Way I Heard It, Returning The Favor, TED.com...] puts it, the superior perspective is Safety Third, with personal responsibility as number 1.
    Expecting an observer to know more/ care more about you [and those around] than individuals, is merely a dodge by insurers, redirecting culpability to an intermediate party, and forms niche of personal injury attorneys.
    With another tip of the hat to their lobbyists...
    Safety co-ordinators have a role, all too often absolving management from ensuring proper training and following of company/site RAMS. This is a classic case illustrating why in the US the 'behavioural safety', blame the worker, 'industry' has taken root and is growing, as it favours employers by using poor employee behaviour's as an excuse, something as a qualified Health and Safety practitioner (UK) and Trade Union H&S rep. we've been fighting to keep out of UK law.

    To quote Mao Tse Tung's "Little Red Book" of observations: "Peoples attitudes and opinions that have been formed over decades of life cannot be changed by holding a few meetings or giving a few lectures".

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    Toolmaker51 (07-14-2020)

  9. #17
    Supporting Member Hoosiersmoker's Avatar
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    Toolmaker51 and NeiljohnUK have perfectly proven my point. With a good H&S person, every one of those people working there would have known instinctively what there role was and where NOT to be during that operation whether that H&S person was there or not. A good H&S person would never have let them on site without thorough, proper training first. "the superior perspective is Safety Third, with personal responsibility as number 1." That sentiment excludes training which is the true superior approach to safety. Also included in our training is the idea of respect for your coworkers and recognizing potential safety risks that might affect them. Where I work I build these in to every aspect of training along with superior risk assessment and superior preventive measures to further reduce risk. Complete ignorance of training and other "rules" is typically when we see an injury but the injured person is retrained not made the scapegoat.


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