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Thread: How to lift objects properly - GIF

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    Andyt (Nov 9, 2022), EnginePaul (Nov 8, 2022), johncg (Nov 9, 2022), mwmkravchenko (Nov 9, 2022), nova_robotics (Nov 8, 2022)

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    Jon
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    Supporting Member mwmkravchenko's Avatar
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    The first video brings back memories of my Opa and my Dad teaching me how to lift. And further memories of the cuffs on the back of the head when I failed to listen!

    Thanks to them I have never hurt my back in a lift. And i have lifted some very heavy things. Knees are another story. Lifting 739 lb crate puts a little pressure on a knee joint. That I hurt! Popped out the meniscus. And then watched it pop back in!

    Mark

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    Lifting objects or pulling heavy lines, cables, chains, etc. I always use a back support/ weightlifting belt.

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    I have a belt too, right after a significant lift.

    I do have the elastic and velcro variety, but use it rarely. They will not avert back strain, unless perhaps unduly tight, just a tangible reminder to watch your position. Not being large, there is a practical limit to what is reasonable. 6" mill vise and swivel, 8" H-V indexers, can still do 12" lathe chucks with jaws removed; the scroll or screws get cleaned and less to catch on something while engaging spindle. Not rotary tables, unless table well below waist and NO fixture keys. There's no decent place to hold that doesn't have your fingers out before you set it down. Holi-moley who designed that s**t?
    What I have done is locate reasonable prices on used lifting gear like die carts. One of them withstands 2000 pounds; it's compact with no jumping in and out of a forklift.
    Sincerely,
    Toolmaker51
    ...we'll learn more by wandering than searching...

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    mwmkravchenko (Nov 10, 2022)

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    Professional Weightlifters and bodybuilders don't use elastic and velcro when lifting hundreds of pounds. They use a 1/4" thick 5" broad leather belt. I speak from 30 years bodybuilding experience.



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    mwmkravchenko (Nov 13, 2022)

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