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Thread: A Pneumatic Horizontal Bandsaw Feedrate Limiter

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    Supporting Member rgsparber's Avatar
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    rgsparber's Tools

    A Pneumatic Horizontal Bandsaw Feedrate Limiter

    Once in a while, I must cut very thin stock on my horizontal bandsaw. This requires a low feedrate. Sure I can do this by slowly lowering the arm but it can get tedious. A solution is to have a saw attachment that can be quickly dropped in place to do the task. Here is one such tool.

    A centerpiece of this article is turning eccentric spigots on round stock.

    If you are interested, please see

    https://rick.sparber.org/PneumaticFeedrateControl.pdf


    Your comments are welcome. All of us are smarter than any one of us.


    Thanks,

    Rick
    Rick

  2. The Following 9 Users Say Thank You to rgsparber For This Useful Post:

    Dorn (03-07-2019), Jon (03-06-2019), Karl_H (03-07-2019), Okapi (03-11-2019), Paul Jones (03-07-2019), saintrain (04-07-2019), Scotsman Hosie (03-07-2019), Seedtick (03-06-2019), Sleykin (03-10-2019)

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    Supporting Member Karl_H's Avatar
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    Cool!
    AirShim hacked a blood pressure cuff for carpenters to use; you hacked it back closer to a BP cuff.

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    Thanks rgsparber! We've added your Pneumatic Horizontal Bandsaw Feedrate Limiter to our Bandsaws category,
    as well as to your builder page: rgsparber's Homemade Tools. Your receipt:




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    Supporting Member Okapi's Avatar
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    Okapi's Tools
    A good idea for people who hasn't access to a Festo store, inexpensive and perfect for occasional use.
    Making sometimes such regulators for a more durable use when you doesn't have any air loss, as you make it with a long threaded metal part, you can make a more sophisticated end at your screw with a O-ring which gave a better sealing, as I have a lot of cut small parts, the use of square aluminium(and 4 jaws chucks on my lathes) permit to screw the part on the construction, turned with eccentricity as yours.

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    Supporting Member rgsparber's Avatar
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    rgsparber's Tools
    Quote Originally Posted by Okapi View Post
    A good idea for people who hasn't access to a Festo store, inexpensive and perfect for occasional use.
    Making sometimes such regulators for a more durable use when you doesn't have any air loss, as you make it with a long threaded metal part, you can make a more sophisticated end at your screw with a O-ring which gave a better sealing, as I have a lot of cut small parts, the use of square aluminium(and 4 jaws chucks on my lathes) permit to screw the part on the construction, turned with eccentricity as yours.
    If I understand correctly, the O ring goes on the end of the screw to give a tighter seal when closed. I can see where that would work nicely but it might cause another problem. When the screw is backed off a little, air flows in the threads. The longer the distance in the threads, the more resistance. With that O ring at the end, how does air get into the threads?

    Rick
    Rick

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    Supporting Member Okapi's Avatar
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    Okapi's Tools
    You use a screw with a conical ending and a not threaded part for the O-ring, the air comes from one side and more you screw and less air can go through it until you come to the plain part which close the diameter.
    You just need enough place to make the plain seat after the threads.

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    Supporting Member rgsparber's Avatar
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    rgsparber's Tools
    Quote Originally Posted by Okapi View Post
    You use a screw with a conical ending and a not threaded part for the O-ring, the air comes from one side and more you screw and less air can go through it until you come to the plain part which close the diameter.
    You just need enough place to make the plain seat after the threads.
    Thanks for the clarification. Now I see why this works. I do have some very small O rings. Just need to redesign the seat of the screw.


    Rick


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