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Thread: Shop Bead Breaker

  1. #1
    wadeamca's Avatar
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    Shop Bead Breaker

    Here are photos of the bead breaker I McGyver’d over the last couple of days from parts/scrap laying around the shop. I took Phil Gaukroger’s idea of using a part of a trailer hitch and jack, but instead of a screw jack, I used one of my old hydraulic jacks.

    Since I wanted to use this in my small shop and not take up much (if any) room, I needed a way of semi-attaching it to my wall. Looking around (and remembering Phil’s idea of using his receiver hitch), I remembered I an old receiver from my truck that was laying against the wall back in the corner. (This receiver was on my truck, but one day a lady in a Jeep tagged the ball and bent the receiver-to- frame mounts. The 2” square hole and the rest of the receiver was still in perfect condition so I cut off the frame mountings and saved the rest).

    I stood the receiver on the left end (where the frame mounting brackets had been) and did some measuring. I cut off the right end so I basically had the 2” square hitch hole and the left end. I then slid some 2” round pipe into the hitch hole and welded that into place and then welded two pieces of 3/8 (or so) angle iron onto each side of the pipe. I had some 1” square tubing so I cut about an inch-long piece, capped one end and welded this piece to the underside of the pipe to accept the screw end of my hydraulic jack. I also needed some way of keeping this bead breaker from rising when I tried to break down a tire so I took about a 4” section of the piece I had previously removed from the receiver and welded it to the bottom of the left end. I lag-bolted a 2’ piece of 4x4 fence post into the wall frame about 3 ½ inches above the floor. And then brush-painted everything with gloss black Rustoleum.

    Now I slid the breaker into position, put the tire in place, put screw from the hydraulic jack into its receptacle and started pumping. As you can see, it worked on a 15” Lincoln Continental rim that’s from my 1936 Hudson Terraplane. And when finished, I can lay it in a corner or hang it from the shop wall. I like it and it's so much faster and easier than a crow-bar and 4-lb sledge hammer.

    The photos give a much better visual description than my words.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Shop Bead Breaker-090723.jpg   Shop Bead Breaker-090737.jpg   Shop Bead Breaker-090753.jpg   Shop Bead Breaker-090828.jpg   Shop Bead Breaker-090917.jpg  

    Shop Bead Breaker-090931.jpg   Shop Bead Breaker-091508.jpg   Shop Bead Breaker-091630.jpg  

  2. The Following 3 Users Say Thank You to wadeamca For This Useful Post:

    augercreek (10-16-2014), kbalch (08-28-2014), Tule (11-12-2018)

  3. #2
    Content Editor Altair's Avatar
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    Great job wadeamca. I like the non-obtrusive design.

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    Thanks wadeamca! I've added your Wall-Mounted Bead Breaker to our Metalworking category, as well as to your builder page: wadeamca's Homemade Tools. Your receipt:


  5. #4
    Content Editor DIYer's Avatar
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    An unusual design, using the jack itself to press down on the bead. I like it!

  6. #5
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    Just scrapped a couple old hitches. Now to find another.
    Well done!

  7. #6
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    Thanks for the words of encouragement. But I can't take all the credit for this idea - I took the jack and trailer hitch idea from Phil Gaukroger at Tech: Cheap bead breaker easy to use.. Since I needed to use it in my shop, I just used an old trailer hitch rather than the back of my truck the way Phil did.

  8. #7
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    Had to make a minor modification --- when I was trying to break down a tire, this kept pulling away from the wall. I drilled a 3/8 hole in the 4x4 support, inserted a carriage bolt through a short chain wrapped around the bead breaker and reattached it to the other end of the carriage bolt. No more problems.
    Last edited by wadeamca; 09-03-2014 at 10:50 AM.

  9. #8
    Content Editor DIYer's Avatar
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    That'd make a pretty strong reinforcement, wadeamca. Much better than a plate at the back which is what I would have probably considered.


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