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Thread: Repairing Nicked Extension Cords

  1. #21
    Supporting Member tonyfoale's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by rgsparber View Post
    I teach the "younger generation" at a local community college and can tell you some are lworthless, some show promise, and some walk on water. No different than any other generation. They just do things differently, like every generation.

    Rick
    The ancient Greeks were concerned about the apparent uselessness of their offspring.

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    Supporting Member Tonyg's Avatar
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    Hi Rick,

    Somehow the thread that you started which was repairing small insulation damage moved to repairing bared wires and jointing extension cables which requires a different approach, I liked your approach and have done similar in the past with different glue. I only started using the Liquid Tape (which I purchased for a totally different problem) just to fill those "small nicks". All my extension cords are 3 core and black in colour so I do not have much of a mismatch.
    As always, thank you for your insightful input.

    Kind regards, Tony.

  4. #23
    Supporting Member Tonyg's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by rgsparber View Post
    I teach the "younger generation" at a local community college and can tell you some are lworthless, some show promise, and some walk on water. No different than any other generation. They just do things differently, like every generation.

    Rick
    Very true , and different pressures on them have increased drastically from the time that I started working in the early 70's

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    Supporting Member Tonyg's Avatar
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    Sort of balanced out with the "Sins of the Fathers" quote I guess.

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    Thanks Rick! We've added your Extension Cord Repair to our Electrical category, as well as to your builder page: Rick's Homemade Tools. Your receipt:


  7. #26
    Supporting Member Rikk's Avatar
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    Just to add to the data here for anyone searching...

    When I have an electrical joint, usually 12v on a truck, motorcycle or especially a race car, I try to use the Grote brand, dual wall, 4:1 heat shrink tubing with adhesive inside.

    I will always put one length of tube, extending a reasonable amount over the spice, then a second layer extending beyond the first. The heat melt glue inside the tubing seems to hold up to about anything and rarely fails. The 4:1 ratio allows plenty of room so you can use the same size tube for both.

    Sometimes, when it's late in the evening or I run out mid-job, I will brush on a significant amount of liquid electrical tape, then position normal heat shrink tube, working it back and forth so the liquid extends beyond the joint then apply heat. Followed by a second layer repeating the process. 20 years ago I used this to repair a dirt bike wiring harness that was snagged on a branch and torn in half. I still ride the bike regularly and have zero problems.

    Both of these seem to work about the same, but the Grote tube with adhesive is MUCH cleaner.

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    Supporting Member rgsparber's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rikk View Post
    Just to add to the data here for anyone searching...

    When I have an electrical joint, usually 12v on a truck, motorcycle or especially a race car, I try to use the Grote brand, dual wall, 4:1 heat shrink tubing with adhesive inside.

    I will always put one length of tube, extending a reasonable amount over the spice, then a second layer extending beyond the first. The heat melt glue inside the tubing seems to hold up to about anything and rarely fails. The 4:1 ratio allows plenty of room so you can use the same size tube for both.

    Sometimes, when it's late in the evening or I run out mid-job, I will brush on a significant amount of liquid electrical tape, then position normal heat shrink tube, working it back and forth so the liquid extends beyond the joint then apply heat. Followed by a second layer repeating the process. 20 years ago I used this to repair a dirt bike wiring harness that was snagged on a branch and torn in half. I still ride the bike regularly and have zero problems.

    Both of these seem to work about the same, but the Grote tube with adhesive is MUCH cleaner.
    It looks like a terrific product but not for Phoenix. Our heat keeps heat glue liquid most of the day. The inside of my garage is at 150F in the summer.

    Rick
    Rick

  10. #28
    Supporting Member Rikk's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by rgsparber View Post
    It looks like a terrific product but not for Phoenix. Our heat keeps heat glue liquid most of the day. The inside of my garage is at 150F in the summer.

    Rick
    Yikes, that's HOT!

    I think the shrink temp is around 170F, but don't quote me.

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    Quote Originally Posted by rgsparber View Post
    It looks like a terrific product but not for Phoenix. Our heat keeps heat glue liquid most of the day. The inside of my garage is at 150F in the summer.

    Rick
    Look at using the sheathing from thicker cables.

    My go to when repairing extension cables is to smooth out the solder joints and then clean with ipa, use adhesive lined shrink wrap, then measure the thickness of the solder joint and cut off a piece of sheathing from a thicker cable that will fit over it, then glue it in place. You cannot control what happens on site - forklifts, wheelbarrows etc ride over it while you are welding 100ft away. Seen failures where the shrink wrapped solder joint pierces into the next wire causing a short.

    On rejoining the outer insulation, I cut it about 4mm shorter than the wire lengths, tie it up with lacing cord, then close up as you have done. I want the outer insulation to carry the strain and not the wires. The wires must be able to move/slide inside.



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