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  1. #1
    Supporting Member mklotz's Avatar
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    One liners

    This style of electrical grounding clamps make good lathe dogs. All you need to do is add a short driver rod to fit against the chuck jaw.




    One of those small adjustable Dremel chucks fitted to a length of tube with a spinner makes a neat little pin vise.




    A small magnifying lens mounted to your prick punch will make marking out a bit easier. Use a bit of heavy copper wire as the mount to allow for fine tuning the focus.




    A sawed-off toothbrush head held to the carriage with a magnet will keep the lead screw free of swarf.



    A tea ball makes a great constrainer for cleaning small parts in solvent.



    Fitting your fishtail gage with a tiny V-block will make holding it square to the workpiece much easier.




    Liquid electrical "tape" applied to tweezer ends will make them tacky and prevent small parts going "sproing".




    Soft, self-adhesive foam weather stripping applied at the edge of the workbench will make a forearm-friendly fence to prevent small parts rolling off.



    186 More Best Homemade Tools eBook
    Last edited by mklotz; Jul 10, 2017 at 05:36 PM.
    ---
    Regards, Marv

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  2. The Following 39 Users Say Thank You to mklotz For This Useful Post:

    almarghi (Oct 25, 2022), astroscuba (Oct 18, 2023), baja (Jul 12, 2019), BuffaloJohn (Nov 5, 2023), Christophe Mineau (Oct 26, 2022), clavius (Jul 18, 2022), dgbreggin (Jul 27, 2022), drivermark (Nov 4, 2023), durrelltn (Nov 6, 2022), emu roo (Nov 3, 2022), freddo4 (Apr 21, 2023), HobieDave (Mar 12, 2020), Home-PC (Mar 8, 2023), jjr2001 (Nov 1, 2018), Jon (Sep 1, 2015), kbalch (Sep 1, 2015), lassab999 (Oct 26, 2020), lavern s (Mar 8, 2023), Make Everything (Nov 5, 2017), Moby Duck (Nov 2, 2023), mr mikey (Nov 2, 2023), mwmkravchenko (Oct 25, 2022), neilbourjaily (Jul 15, 2022), odd one (Jul 26, 2022), oldcaptainrusty (Oct 18, 2017), PJs (Sep 2, 2015), rendoman (Aug 6, 2016), rlm98253 (Nov 2, 2017), Scotsman Hosie (Jul 13, 2019), Sleykin (Dec 27, 2023), stubb (Jul 10, 2019), that_other_guy (Nov 18, 2022), thevillageinn (Jul 16, 2022), Tonyg (Jul 10, 2019), Toolmaker51 (Mar 14, 2017), trevor_60_r (Nov 18, 2022), uv8452 (Jul 15, 2022), will52100 (Jul 9, 2019), yvonf (Nov 18, 2022)

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    kbalch's Avatar
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    Thanks Marv! I've added your Lathe Dogs, Lead Screw Cleaner, Pin Vise, and Punch Magnifier to, respectively, our Lathe Accessories, Vises, and Measuring and Marking categories, as well as to your builder page: mklotz's Homemade Tools. Your receipt:


    2000 Tool Plans

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    boggybud (Nov 4, 2022)

  5. #3
    kbalch's Avatar
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    Thanks Marv! I've added your Small Parts Cleaner, Fishtail Gauge, Tweezer Modification, and Workbench Modification to, respectively, our Cleaning, Measuring and Marking, Workholding, and Workbenches categories, as well as to your builder page: mklotz's Homemade Tools. Your receipt:


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    great ideas here

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    Supporting Member mwmkravchenko's Avatar
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    Pictures don't do the ideas enough justice. Thanks Marv!

  8. #6
    Supporting Member mklotz's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mwmkravchenko View Post
    Pictures don't do the ideas enough justice. Thanks Marv!
    If you would like me to expound on anything, just indicate which ideas and what further explanation you would like. I'll try to answer your questions.
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    Supporting Member mwmkravchenko's Avatar
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    I think I understand them all well enough. The drive dog I had to think about a little. Are you holding a centre in the chuck and then clamping the ground clamp onto the object you wish to drive?

  10. #8
    Supporting Member mklotz's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mwmkravchenko View Post
    I think I understand them all well enough. The drive dog I had to think about a little. Are you holding a centre in the chuck and then clamping the ground clamp onto the object you wish to drive?
    Yes, exactly. With the work held between centers, there are a number of ways to drive the work. Most "dogs" consist of something that clamps to the work; drive force can come from a pin projecting from a face plate mounted behind the center. Sometimes the pin is integral to the dog and fits into a slot in the face plate.

    When I need to work between centers I like to have the 3jaw mounted. A piece of steel clamped in the chuck is turned to a 60 degree point. This approach guarantees that the center is perfectly aligned with the rotation axis of the lathe spindle. If the stock I'm turning permits, the chuck end of the stock is drilled to accept a Loctited pin that is driven by the chuck jaws. With no projecting dog bits spinning about this approach is much safer than the conventional dog. Of course, if that technique isn't possible, I use the dog shown in the picture.
    ---
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    mwmkravchenko (Oct 26, 2022)

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    Supporting Member drivermark's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mwmkravchenko View Post
    Pictures don't do the ideas enough justice. Thanks Marv!
    +1

    Had to add at least 10 characters to post.

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    Quote Originally Posted by mklotz View Post
    Yes, exactly. With the work held between centers, there are a number of ways to drive the work. Most "dogs" consist of something that clamps to the work; drive force can come from a pin projecting from a face plate mounted behind the center. Sometimes the pin is integral to the dog and fits into a slot in the face plate.

    When I need to work between centers I like to have the 3jaw mounted. A piece of steel clamped in the chuck is turned to a 60 degree point. This approach guarantees that the center is perfectly aligned with the rotation axis of the lathe spindle. If the stock I'm turning permits, the chuck end of the stock is drilled to accept a Loctited pin that is driven by the chuck jaws. With no projecting dog bits spinning about this approach is much safer than the conventional dog. Of course, if that technique isn't possible, I use the dog shown in the picture.
    Pretty cool, Marv. This suggests a number of different approaches to making a whole set of lathe dogs that solve the age old problem of 3 jaw chuck runout. A given set would be custom for just that chuck and it's custome worn scroll.. But it's really just an afternoon's work of relatively simple machining. You color code each set for one specific chuck. When the price of a new Bison chuck makes that approach out of the question this approach comes to the rescue. Ed Weldon

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